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Full text of "The syllabus of Northwestern University"



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LINDSAY BROS 




Special Discount of 10 per cent, to Clergymen and Biblical Students. 



Ill MONROE STREET, 



IVTOTSTTATTK" RT.OPK 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS GO 
LIBRARY 



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ARTIST! 

Mathem 

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MANUFACTURER OF 



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Special Disgounts to Students. 



507 DAVIS STREET 



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F. W. DEYOE & SO.'S 

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COLLEGIANS' outfitting ESTABLISHMENT. 

Wilde's Qlotbing ^ouse, Chicago. 




Two-thirds of your life is spent in 
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It is often said " handsome fitting clothes 
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For Wilde's Tailor-Made Clothing forces 
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Spring Overcoats for Street or Traveling, $10 
Young Men's Silk Faced Overcoats, - - 13 
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The Finest Art can produce, with Silk Lin- 
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Spring Suits, Evening Dress, $20, $25, $28, 30 
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Our $5.00 and $8.00 Pantaloons Conquer every 

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where such thorough reliability and low 
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FURNISHING GOODS 

To your heart's content. 

ALL THE NEW NOVELTIES 
As fast as they appear. 

Call and see with your own eyes. 




JAMES WILDE, JR., & CO., 

Cor. State and Madison Sts., 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

FRANK REED, Manager. 




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70 State Street. 



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Opposite Central Nltasic Hall. 



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Established 1872. 

\ Students= = You are invited to make our Store 

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GINN & COMPANY PUBLISH 

Elementary 

English. 

Higher 

English. 

Old English. 
Latin. 



Greek. 

Sanscrit. 

Mathematics. 

Music. 

Philosophy. 

History. 

AND MANY 
j^°Send for Descriptive 

GINN & CO., Publishers 



Classics for Children. (Send for circular). Whit- 
ney & Knox's Language Series. Hazen's Spelling 
Book. Stickney's Primer, Turner's Primer and 
First Reader and Stories for Children. 
Hudson's School and Harvard Shakespeare, and 
pamphlet selections of prose and poetry. Ban- 
croft's Composition. Choice Headings, Hand- 
book of Poetics. Irving. Milton. 
Baskersvill's Andreas. Beowulf. Caedmon. 
Sievers' Grammar. Garnett's translation of 
Beowulf. 

Allen & Greenough's Grammar and Texts with 
Lessons. Greenough's Virgil. Allen's Composi- 
tion. Lexicons. Classical Atlas. 
Goodwin's Grammar and Anabasis. Leighton 
& White's Lessons. College Series of Authors. 
Texts of Euripides, Demosthenes. 
Perry's Primer. Whitney's Grammar. Lanman's 
Reader. 

Wentworth's Series. Arithmetics, Algebras, 
Geometries, Trigonometry, Surveying, Tables, 
Taylor's and Byerly's Calculus. 
The National Music Course, comprising a com- 
plete series of charts and books for schools of all 
grades. New grades coming out. 
Seelye's Hickok's Mental Science and Moral 
Science Lotze's Outlines, translated by Prof. 
Ladd. 

Myers' Mediaeval and Modern History. Mont- 
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Readers' Guide to English History. 
OTHER BOOKS. 
Catalogue and. Circulars.,^ 

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and CHICAGO. 




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^emple * of ® (^conorm/ 1 

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44 



Six Thousand Customers and Ten Thousand New and Happy 
Homes every year is our work. 



WE FURNISH 



PATERNITY H71LjLj3, {«- 

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And our stock comprises nearly every conceivable article of Household 

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Therefore, in the future always remember 

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And it will pay you. 

Cor. Fifth Ave. and Randolph St. 




MLMEZI 



«*1886& 



^ 



PUBLISHED BY 



OF THE 



^Northwestern University. 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO : 

Brown, Pettibone & Co., Printers. 

1886. 



(JBtrttortal * Boartr, 



HARRY HAMILL, B 9 II, Editor-in-Chief. 

STEPHEN J. HERBEN, <£ K W. 

EDWIN L. SHUMAN, 2 X. 

FRANK A. DRAPER, $ K 2. 

ROBERT I. FLEMING, A T, 
ADA M. PEART, A <£. 

MATTIE P. HUTCHISON, K K T. 

JOSIE B. CRANDON, A F. 



^^^^^f^- 



JFmanctal * JSoarlx 



FRANK J. CAMPBELL, <Z> K W, Business Manager. 
WILLIAM D. BARNES, <2> K 2. 

HENRY CADDOCK, 2 X. 

HARVEY BROWN, B 9 II. 

OSCAR MIDDLEKAUFF, A T. 
ALBERTINE C. WALES, A <2>. 

IDA T. SUNDERLAND, K K I\ 

HATTIE T. HAW, A F. 



''wv^v^v w 






To all persons of a liberal and philan* 
thropical turn of mind, who possess a fortune 
of fifty Cents and over, this volume is most 
cordially dedicated by the 

ditors. 



2» 



97803 




Greeting. 



C-: 



«3 



Qim 



HIS second volume of the Syllabus appears in spite of the oppo- 
C/ sition of the most adverse circumstances. Two editors-in-chief 
resigned ; one associate-editor left ; our first business manager was 
called away to pastures new, and two of his associates left. No work 
was done until the second term ; but then the grand array of genius 
and ability overcame all obstacles and pushed on to a successful issue 
the work so tardily begun. 

* " Whatever improvement upon the last there may be in this 
volume, the reader will readily perceive ! 

" Our aim has been to make this volume commend itself by its 
worth to the student communit}^ and to the Alumni as a book " of 
rare merit — and to pay our expenses ! 

We hope we have succeeded. 



Quoted from Syllabus of '85. 




-^sisifyfy- Wyg) resident * n 



JOSEPH CUMMINGS, D.D., LL.D., President of Northwestern Uni- 
versity, was born at Falmouth, Maine, March 3, 1817. He graduated 
from the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Conn., in 1840. He 
then took a position in Amenia Seminary, New York, as teacher of 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics. From 1843 to 1846 he was Principal 
of the Seminary, but at the end of that period joined the New England 
Conference of the M. E. Church. He remained in the active work of the 
ministr} 7 , filling some of the leading pulpits in New England, until 1853, 
when he accepted the Professorship of Theology in the Methodist General 
Biblical Institute, Concord, N. H. In the following year his Alma Mater 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. He was for three 
years President of Genesee College, Lima, N. Y., and in 1857 was called 
to the Presidency of Wesleyan University. This position he filled until 
1875. The eighteen years of Dr. Cummings' Presidency at Middletown 
were among the most prosperous and progressive of that honored institu- 
tion. In 1863 a gymnasium was added. In 1868 a library building, 
capable of containing 10,000 volumes, was erected at a cost of $40,000. 
A chapel was built in 1871, and dedicated to the memory of the students 
and alumni of the institution who had fallen in the War of the Rebellion. 
In the same year a hall for Natural Sciences, costing $100,000, was 
added. In 1872, young women were for the first time admitted to the 
University. Dr. Cummings received the degree of D.D. from Harvard 
University in 1861, and in 1866 the degree of LL.D. from Northwestern 
University, After resigning the Presidenc}- in 1875, Dr. Cummings 
retained his position as Professor of Mental Philosophy and Political 
Economy for two years, after which he occupied the pulpit at Maiden, 
Mass., until 1879, when he went to Harvard Street, Cambridge, where he 
remained until called to the Presidency of Northwestern University in 



,A^A^*m 



1881. His administration among us has been marked by that vigor and 
thoroughness which form prominent features in Dr. Cummings' character. 
A more liberal elective system has been devised, and the curriculum 
modified in other ways to meet the demands upon our growing institu- 
tion. Improvements in and around the University buildings and gym- 
nasium have been made as fast as the funds of the school would allow. 
In scholarship and morality the standards insisted upon by Dr. Cum- 
mings are of the highest character. 

A comparatively small part of the useful and honored career of our 
President has been spent in connection with our own University. He 
came to us crowned with years of noble achievement in the departments 
of educational, literary and religious thought. 

In the class-room we are impressed with the breadth of his views 
and the keenness of his intellect ; out of it he inspires us with the force 
of his personal character. 

With a career so honored and successful both in the past and pres- 
ent, it is our hope that many years of usefulness may yet be allotted to 
our President. 





BONERIGHT. 







^ ^ 



4* 



ROBER1 






JOSEPJ 







,RSON. 





JULIUS F. KELLOGG. 



%^f^ 



I 




: KT F. FI5K. 




ROBERT BAIRD. 




^HEPPARD. 



JUNG. 



JOSEPH CILMMINGS, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1840 ($ B K), (# N Q) : D.D., Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, 1854, Harvard University, 1861 ; LL.D., N. W. U., 1861. i 
President, and Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Phi- 
losophy. 

DANIEL BONBRIGHT, A.M., 

Yale College, 1850 (# B K) ; LL.D., Lawrence University, 1878. 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

OLIVER MARCY, A. B., 

Wesleyan University, 1846 {$ B K), ($ N Q) ; LL.D., University of 
Chicago, 1873. 
Deering Professor of Natural History, and Curator of Museum. 

JULIUS F. KELLOGG, A. M., 

Noyes Professor of Mathematics, and Registrar of the Faculty. 

HENRY S. CARHART, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1869 (W V), ($ B K). 
Professor of Physics, and Secretary of Faculty. 

HERBERT F. FISK, A. M., 

Wesleyan University, 1860 ($ B K), (<£ 2V S). 
Professor, and Principal in Preparatory. 

ROBERT M. CUMNOCK, A. M., 

Wesleyan University, 1868 (<£ B K), (W T). 
Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution. 

ROBERT BAIRD, A. M., 

N. W. U., 1869 ($KW). 
Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

CHARLES W. PEARSON, A. M., 

N. W. U., 1871 ($ KW). 
Professor of English Literature axt> Histoky. 

ROBERT D. SHEPPARD, A.M., 

Chicago University, 1869 (^ K W) ; D.D., Garrett Biblical Inst., 1885. 
Professor of History and Political Economy. 

A. Y. E. Y r OUNG, Ph. B., 

Michigan University, 1875 (A K E). 
Professor of Chemistry. 

MARSHALL D. EWELL, M.D. 

Michigan University, LL.B., 1868; Michigan University, LL.D., 1879. 
Instructor in Microscopy. 

RENA A. MICHAELS, A.M., 

Syracuse University, 1874 (A $) ; Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1880. 
Dean of Woman's College, and Professor of French Language and 
Literature. 

CATHARINE BEAL, B. P., 

Syracuse University, 1876 (A <£). 
Director of Art Department. 



vmv^vmv*m*****ri 





nme^sityf ^^nstees. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Hon. JOHN EVANS, M.D President. 

ORRINGTON LUNT Vice-President. 

JAMES G. HAMILTON Secretary. 

THOMAS C. HOAG Treasurer. 

THOMAS C. HOAG Agent. 

ELECTED BY THE BOARD. 

Term Expires 1886. 

EDMUND ANDREWS, M.D., LL.D Chicago. 

JAMES FRAKE, A.M., LL.B Chicago. 

NATHAN SMITH DAVIS. M.D., LL.D Chicago. 

HENRY SARGENT TOWLE, LL.B Chicago. 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM Chicago. 

JOSEPH CUMMINGS, D.D., LL.D Evanston. 

JAMES S . KIRK Evanston. 

Rev. ROBERT M. HATFIELD, D.D Evanston. 

Term Expires 1887. 

Hon. GRANT GOODRICH, LL.D Chicago. 

WILLIAM DEERING Evanston. 

OTIS HARDY Joliet. 

CATHARINE E. QUEAL Evanston. 

WILLIAM A. FULLER Chicago. 

JAMES B. HOBBS Chicago. 

FRANK P. CRANDON Evanston. 

Hon. JAMES B. BRADWELL Chicago. 

Term Expires 1888. 

J ABEZ K. BOTSFORD Chicago. 

Hon. JOHN EVANS, M.D Denver, Col. 

JOSIAH J. PARKHURST Evanston. 

THOMAS C. HOAG Evanston. 

DAVID McWILLIAMS Dwight. 

Rev. RICHARD HANEY, D.D Monmouth. 

TURLINGTON W. HARVEY Chicago. 

E. J. FOWLER WILLING, A.M Chicago. 

MARY FISH Joliet. 

DAVID R. DYCHE, M.D Evanston. 

Term Expires 1889. 

PHILIP B. SHUMWAY, A.M Evanston. 

ORRINGTON LUNT Evanston. 

HENRY A. PEARSONS, A.M Evanston. 

JAMES G. HAMILTON Evanston. 

CHARLES BUSBY Chicago. 

ROBERT D. FOWLER Chicago. 

OLIVER H. HORTON, LL.B Chicago. 

GEORGE H. FOSTER Milwaukee. 

JOHN E. WILSON Chicago. 

MARY B. WILLARD Evanston. 

8 



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'V^V* 



f^- ■*■ * ^ A -^ ■*■ -^ -*-^ 




-Jjepartmervts of niversity 




(Lollege of liberal ^T^rts. 




X 



* 




3 




|ELLO there ! Have you decided what class } T ou're going 
to join ? " 

" I am still on the fence, but am leaning a little toward 
Soph side, and may drop that wa}' at any time." 

" pshaw ! Now, come here and listen to me. After 
you have heard some of the heroic deeds of our class I 
think you will immediately decide in our favor." 
" Well, if 3-011 can prove that you are superior to former Freshmen, 
I'll agree to cast my lot with you." 

" In the first place we are unusually verdant and fresh ; we are 
spun, woven and made up of greens. Our professors tell us that not- 
withstanding our extreme rawness we compare very favorably with 
Freshman classes gone before ; that we have shown an equally large 
stock of desire for knowledge ; that we have as seldom ' cut church,' and 
less seldom recitations. 'Tis true there is no spontaneous gush to our 
fluency in the class room, still we always wear that I-know-but I-can't- 
think expression on our faces which satisfies the most exacting professor. 
Wouldn't } 7 ou like to hear about a victory of ours over the Sophs last 
term ? I think if nothing else will bring you around that will. The 
Sophs had a supper. One heroic Freshman said that night he was 



10 



'»^t^»^»^i 



' V <m v w w w v w* 



willing to give, if necessary, his 3'oung life as a bloody sacrifice to the 
honor of his class. In the words of the illustrious commander, ' he met 
the enenry and — he was theirs.' He hid in the attic of the house where 
the spread was to be, waited until the Sophs went in to partake of the 
sumptuous repast, then stole quietly into the cloak room and threw 
overcoats, cloaks and wraps out of the window. It would have been well 
for him had he followed the wraps, but therein he showed his verdancy. 
He then went back thinking to find a spot to feast his hungry eyes on 
the luxurious viands placed before the Sophs. He drew near the dining- 
room just as a brilliant Soph was responding to the toast ' our girls ' — 
' bless-um-dear-creatures-all-of-um-oh-how-I-luv-um.' It is needless to 
say our Freshie smiled audibly. I will tell you the rest in the hero's 
own words : ' Before I had fairty recovered from that smile, I was sur- 
rounded by the blood-thirsty Sophs. One great big fellow caught me by 
the coat collar, another grabbed me by the neck, another dusted the 
tables, chairs and floor with the back of my clothes. Then they all 
pitched in and stuffed their whole supper down m}~ throat. The bill of 
fare consisted of hash, prunes, beans, hard tack, molasses and water, and 
I tell you it was hard to swallow. I was just getting mad when they let 
me go, and it was a good thing they did, too.' " 

" There, what do you think of us now ? " 

" That's enough to turn a man with a heart of stone in your favor.'' 

" Join '89 ? " 

"Well, I guess I will." 

" It makes me smile." 




11 



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^^* 




^7^^ 



nin: 



— & 
1 

# 



0ffieers. 

HERBERT F. BRIGGS, 
MINNIE JONES, . 
BENJAMIN L. McFADDEN, . 
STELLA BASS, . 
STEPHEN J. HERBEN, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 



7V\embers. 



Bassett, George, South Evanston. 

Baxter, Andrew Lawson, Chicago. 

Beers, Forrest Wm., A T, Evanston, 

Blodgett, Frank Hodge, # K W, Beloit, Wis., 

Briggs, Herbert Ftsk, B <-) IT, Napa, Cal., 

Byam, Norton Horsford, South Evanston, 

Demorest, Frederick Coe, A T, Muscatine, Iowa, 

Denny, Charles Norton, AT, Blair, Neb., 

Dixon, Geo. William, $ K W, Chicago, 

Dunlap, Harry Lane, Paxton, 

Elmore, Arthur E., A T, RockforcU 

Farley, Samuel, A T, Marengo, Iowa, 

Ferguson, Charles Wesley, A T, Malta, 

Ferguson, Clayton Chester, Evanston, 

Gifford, William Edgar, Evanston, 

Graves, Charles Stephen, <P K W, Wallace, 

Greene, Evarts Boutell, Evanston, 

Hamilton, Joseph Robert, Argyle, Wis., 

Herben, Stephen Joseph, $ K W, Jersey City, N. J. 

Holden, Robt. Hyde, A T, Baraboo, Wis., 

Howard, Otis McGaw, 2 X, Glencoe. 

Howell, Harold, Des Moines, 

Kunstman, Gustav William, A T, Chicago, 

Leonard, Herbert G., A T, Minneapolis, 

Lyman, Nathan Adelbert, $ K W, Rockf ord, 

Middlekauff, Wilbur, Forreston. 

Morse, Chas. Leavitt, Evanston, 



420 Church Street. 
Emerson Street. 
207 Davis Street. 
Kedzie Street. 
47 Heck Hall. 
425 Church Street. 
714 Emerson Street. 
217 Orrington Ave. 
South Evanston. 
44 Heck Hall. 
Greenwood Street. 
Chicago Ave. 
Chicago Ave. 
465 Emerson Street. 
203 Davis Street. 
50 Heck Hall. 
461 Emerson Street. 
317 Davis Street. 

737 Chicago Ave. 
428 Church Street. 
47 Heck Hall. 
714 Chicago Ave. 
516 Judson Ave. 
418 Clark Street. 



12 



McFadden, Benjamin L., 2 X, 
Stevens, Charles L., 2 X, 
Sullivan, Mark Linus, 
Tisdel, Clark James, B & 77, 
Waugh, Frederick Coe, 
Weeden, Burr Miller, 2 X, 
Whitehead, Frank Cole, B & 77, 
Wright, Charles Burton, 
Young, John Ballantyne, B & 72, 
Babcock, Florence, 
Bass, Stella, A $, 
Brown, Lizzie Myra, 
Caraway, Blanche, 
Cleveland, Frances Sevella, 
Edwards, Elizabeth Belle, A #, 
Foster, Grace Ida, A <P, 
Foster, Sara Mitchell, A T, 
Gammon, Dora May, 
Jones, Nettie L., 
Jones, Minnie, A <f>, 
Ludlow, Theresa, 
Lyford, Charlotte E., 
Morse, Isabel Russell, K K F, 
Noyes, Lizzie Browning, 
O'Neill, Sara A., 
Richey, May C, 
Townsend, Ada, K KT, 
Wire, Jennie Louise, 



Havana, 

Chicago, 

Chicago, 

RockSpring,W.T., 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Woodstock, 

Elgin, 

Chicago, 

Evanston, 

FondduLac,Wis., 

Tuscola, 

Sterling, 

Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Milwaukee, Wis., 

Odell, 

Arlington Heights, 

Evanston, 

Paxton, 

Evanston, , 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Ottawa, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 



317 Chicago Ave. 
Park Street. 
1021 Orrington Ave. 
Union Hall Block. 
222 Judson Ave. 
Emerson Street. 
137 Davis Street. 
628 Chicago Ave. 
Emerson Street. 
Woman's College. 
724 Grove Street. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
College Cottage. 
510 Maple Ave. 
Woman's College. 
836 Chicago Ave. 
College Cottage. 
College Cottage. 
College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 
745 Orrington Ave. 
418 Clark Street. 
Grove Street. 
2963 Wabash Ave. 
Woman's College. 
719 Hinman Ave. 
College Cottage. 




13 



I 



I 





OPHOMORE ! it needs but to utter the name, 
For all acknowledge the rank we claim ; 
We personify intellect, strength and skill, 
We represent chivalry, valor and fame, 
What we undertake, we do with a will. 
Well we remember when first we came, — 
How we hated and grumbled at lessons too — 
That Trig. — of Freshman's life the bane, 
But we conquered of course, we always do. 
And then we decided to lay it to rest, 
Yet we fear its spirit has haunted a few. 
The Sophs then thought they'd spoil our fun, 
The}- captured our chief and a speaker or two, 
And very kindly, to save us expense, 
They issued programs of the evening's events. 
We missed a few from the solemn scene, 
But we buried poor Trig, on the campus green. 



14 



And this is but one of the many occasions 

Where we have outwitted the envious foe. 

There's no need to tell, for everyone knows, 

How the Freshies were left 

When they plotted the theft 

Of some of the Sophomores' clothes. 

But why should we tany and stop here to state 

All the deeds which have glowed on our records of late ? 

Just ask the professors, ask one and ask all 

For the brightest class in the college hall ; 

They'll show you a record grand and great 

And tell you 'twas made by Eighty-eight. 




u* 



15 



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I <m,%amm . 

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ffisgn ss^s as asgHsz^nsag aaa^ BHSE 



0ffieers, 



HARVEY R. CALKINS, 
ANNIE M. SWIFT, 
OSCAR MIDDLEKAUFF, 
HATTIE T. HAW, 
IRA C. CARTWRIGHT, 



President. 
Vice- President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Chaplain. 



7V\embers, 



Austin, Edward William, 

Bass, George A., $ K W, 

Bass, Perkins Burnham, $ K W, 

Bennett, Charles Steven, W 1", 

Booth, Charles Horace, $ K W, 

Byers, Fred. M., 

Bradford, Columbus, A V, 

Caddock, Henry, 2 X, 

Calkins, Harvey Reeves, B & 77, 

Cartwright, Ira Chester, 

Clifford, Chester Carroll, 

Davidson, Eric Adolphus, 

Derbyshire, Will Grant, 

Edwards, Arthur Robin, B & II, 

Engelke, Julius, 

Hall, William Augustus, $ K W, 

Hitt, Isaac Reynolds, 

Hubbard, Giles, 2 X, 

Hunt, John E., B S 77, 

Johnson, Isaac, 

llnebarger, charles elijah, a v, 



Woodstock, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Thawville, 

Kirkland, 

Licking, Mo., 

Newark, N. J., 

Evanston, 

St. Louis, Mo., 

Evanston, 

Trade Lake, Wis. 

Kenosha, Wis., 

Chicago, 

Sydna, Iowa, 

Chicago, 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Ashton, 

Capron, 111., 

Hinckley, 

16 



Univ. PI. & Chi. Ave. 
724 Grove Street. 
724 Grove Street. 
828 Hinman Ave. 
Opp. Preparatory. 
Chicago Ave. 
Room 44, Heck Hall. 
Opp. Preparatory. 
621 Judson Ave. 
Heck Hall, Room 43. 
620 Chicago Ave. 
Swedish Seminary. 
Davis Street. 
137 Davis Street. 
Sherman Ave. 
456 Church Street. 
723 Chicago Ave. 
Chi. Ave. & Church St. 
818 Hinman Ave. 
43 Heck Hall. 
28 Foster Street. 



I 



Little, Frank, $ KW, Osage City, Kan., 

Middlekauff, Oscar, A V, Rockford, 

Middlekauff, Samuel Henry, Rockford, 

Page, Edward Carlton, Mt. Morris, 

Quereau, Edmund Chase, B & II, Aurora, 

Richardson, George 0., Evanston, 

Thwing, Charles Burton, <P KW, Hamilton, Mo., 

Tuttle, William Harvey, # K W, Dunlap, 

Vandercook, Robert Oatman, Evanston, 

Allen Cora, A <P, Turner Junction, 

Alling, Elmina Belle, K K r, Evanston, 

Chapin, Louella, Chicago, 

Earle, Mary Hattie, Taylor, 

Fitch, Julia Paddock, Kansas City, Mo., 

Keely, Lila Fame, A <P, Nora, 
Moulding, Elizabeth Watkins, A #, Chicago, 

Pearsons, Helen M., A <P, Evanston, 

Sumner, Mary E., A $, Schuyler, Neb., 

Sunderland, Ida Thorne, K K jH, Englewood, 

Stevenson, Luna Elizabeth, Boone, Iowa, 

Swift, Annie May, A $, Union Stock Yards 

Thatcher, Mabelle, River Forest, 



Univ.Pl.&Chi.Ave. 
1019 Sherman Ave. 
1019 Sherman Ave. 
1019 Sherman Ave. 
624 Chicago Ave. 
Opp. Preparatory. 
461 Emerson Street. 
Cor. Davis Street. 
452 Church Street. 
Woman's College. 
Benson Ave, 
300 W.Jackson Street. 
1023 Sherman Ave. 
College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
714 Chicago Ave. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 
812 Hinman Ave. 




17 





pHERE have been a few classes toward which the gaze of the 
college world has been directed with the profoundest admira- 
tion and respect. Their superiority has been so manifest that 
all, from the highest to the lowest, from the President to the 
Prep, have combined to do them honor. But the bright 
particular star of this small cluster of brilliants has been 
without doubt the class of '87. 

Like Minerva we sprang full armed from thundering Jupiter. Our 
valorous deeds have been sung in every tongue. Do you doubt our 
claims ? Go to '86, and ask those boastful Bibs who brought them 
bound hand and foot before the fairest tribunal forsooth the sun ever 
shone upon, and made them answer for their misdeeds. 

Who so filled them with fear and trembling at sight of our pow- 
erful brawn that they dared not meet us on the cleated floor in manly 
contest for tug of war ? Whose banners waived triumphant o'er the 
field in public debate ? With downcast eyes and mournful visage 
they murmur " Eight}^-seven." 

18 






Go to '88, and hear of them how their presumption was sorely 
punished and their impudent canes broken over their heads. Who 
boldly cheeked their disgusting orgies over the remains of their defunct 
enemy and our whilom friend, T. Rig ? 

In declamation, how vain their efforts to win from us the laurel 
wreath ! But why go further ? Our deeds are household words. Our 
fame is won. Now we can enjoy the pleasures of philosophy, art and 
song with a pleasing consciousness that so long as chivalric virtues 
are in good repute, our memory will be warmly cherished by future 
generations. 




19 



e$£0£&&k%ites 




nDnnnnnaDDnnnnnD.DnnDD 



!EigHty=S£ven. 



□nnDDDDnnnnnDDnnDDnan 




"&%%&&&&&*' 



Qfficers, 



HUGH ATCHISON, 
LODILLA AMBROSE, 
EDWIN L. SHUMAN, . 
FRANK MIDDLEKAUFF, 
RUTER W. SPRINGER, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 



7V\embers. 



Atchison, Hugh, A T, Sycamore, 

Brand, Charles Herbert, A T, Polo, 

Brown, Harvey, B & IT, Evanston, 

Campbell, Frank James, $ K W, Fargo, D. T. 

Davis, Smith Cornell, Evanston, 

Gloss, David'Hamilton, Evanston, 

Hall, Winfield Scott, $ K W, Ayr, Neb.. 

Larash, George Irwin, A V, Peoria, 

Lewis, Charles George, B S U, Evanston, 
McLennan. William Etridge, $22" IP, Evanston, 

Middlekaufp, Frank Gibson, Forreston, 



Park Street. 
University Place. 
137 Chicago Ave. 
456 Church Street. 
42 Heck Hall. 
1019 Sherman Ave. 
Foster Street. 
25 Heck Hall. 
Oak & Lake Sts. 
Cor.Univ.Pl.&Chi.Av 
516 Judson Ave. 



20 



Place, Chester A., Evanston, 743 Orrington A 


i \ 


Raymond, William Chamberlin, 


Evanston, 411 Ridge Ave. 


i * 




Chicago, Greenwood Strec 


* 
it. > 


Springer, Ruter William, 2 X, 


Springfield, Chicago Ave. 


i [ 


Stowe, Bond, B 77, 


Evanston, 629 Hinman Ave 




Wright, Herbert Perry, 2 X, 


Woodstock, 628 Chicago Ave 


I 


Alling, Kate Mariah, K K r, 


Evanston, Benson Ave. 


i ) 


Ambrose, Lodilla, 


Evanston, Emerson Street. 


i 


Coon, Henrietta Marie, A $, 


Hanna City, College Cottage. 


\ [ 


Crandon, Josie Bentley, A F, 


ColumbiaFalls,Me.,312 Forest Ave. 


; > 


David, Mary E., 


Minooka, College Cottage 


' 


Gloss, Janet Clive, 


Evanston, 1019 Sherman A^ 


; 


Harvey, Ida Mary, 


Chicago, College Cottage. 


> 


Holden, Helen Minerva, 


Baraboo, Wis., College Cottage. 


> 


Hutchison, Mattie P., KKF, 


Mineral Pt.,Wis., Woman's Colleg 


e- ! 


Towle, Frances, A $, 


Evanston, 741 Orrington A 


ve. J 


Wales, Carrie Albertine, A $, 


Lanark, 714 Chicago Ave 


► 


Watson, Margaret Selkirk, 


Evanston, 310 Ridge Ave. 


1 ► 
> 

! 
1 

> 
i 






H s 


j ► 






fSPH 






v L^K II HHI tit 


jfHwjp^^l 


1 > 

j! 




^sJP^^5sl jjjjEj 


lailKB 


i > 
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21 


> 




( 



(^71 GREETING is but the prelude to a farewell. When we entered 
Gj>\ these halls, consecrated to learning, this present seemed far in 






the future ; but the time so long looked for has at length 



arrived. We have advanced steadily up the mount Parnassus until the 
summit is reached, and from senior heights we look back upon our fresh- 
man days, which seem but a speck in the distance. 

Our numbers are smaller than they have been in corresponding 
classes for several years ; but although 86 has lost some of its brightest 
stars, yet she has received several worthy additions. 

Since we were last called upon to cite the annals of '86, very little 
has occurred worthy of note, so our history is brief ; yet it is a history 
of hard work, earnest endeavor and merited success. Our class has a 
record of which she may well be proud. We look into the future and 
see ourselves pointed out as worthy models for succeeding classes. We 
have sought for fame, for glory, and an undying name, and w T ho says 
that the} 7 are not ours ? 

22 



The time is almost here when '86 shall perform her last requisite 
services and receive an honorable discharge. Our college race is nearly 
run, and the goal which seemed so distant and shadowy when we began 
will soon be in our grasp. We are very near that " golden milestone" 
where our progress must be halted, and each bidding adieu to his mates 
must separate and wander forth alone into a new and cruel country — the 
world. We go, better prepared for what the future may bring, on account 
of school discipline, the effects of which will be more strongly felt in time 
to come. As we cut loose from the moorings of our Alma Mater, we 
shall -'look not mournfully into the past, it comes not back again." We 
will " wisely improve the present, it is ours, and go forth to meet the 
shadow}' future without fear and with brave hearts." 

The lessons that may henceforth come to us ma}' require more 
earnest thought and study than any which text-books contain, but as we 
separate it will be with a determination to gain the mastery. Destiny 
may bring no sudden changes to us, yet it is with feelings of heartfelt 
sorrow that we say — 

"FAREWELL." 




23 







HENRY L. KINDIG, 
MINNIE E. KING, 
E. A. SCHELL, . 
ANNA 0. PETERSON, 
C. S. T0MLINS0N, 



Qfficers, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

/Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Chaplain. 



TVlembers, 



Colman, Edward L., $K~2, La Crosse, Wis., 

Edmondson, Stuakt Parrott, $KW, Sumner, 



Fleming, Robert Isaac, AT, 
Hill, Joseph H., <£ K W, 
Kindig, Henry Leonidas, 2 X, 
Perley, Lyman Ormond, <P K W, 
Schell, Edwin Allison, $ K W, 
Tomlinson, Clinton S., B & n, 
Bumann, Caroline C, 
King, Minnie Effie, 
Peart, M. Ada, A &, 
Peterson, Anna Olivia, 



Hannibal, Mo., 
Emporia, Kan., 
New Sharon, la., 
Emporia, Kan., 
Crown Point, Ind., 
Boone, Iowa, 
St. Louis, Mo., 
Evanston, 
Braid wood, 
Galva, 



Van Benschoten, May Eva, K K V, Evanston, 



Avenue House. 
49 Heck Hall. 
49 Heck Hall. 
1313 Chicago Ave. 
10 Heck Hall. 
1313 Chicago Ave. 
39 Heck Hall. 
137 Chicago Ave. 
Woman's College. 
1040 Chicago Ave. 
College Cottage. 
College Cottage. 
321 Chicago Ave. 



24 






Special Students. 



Andrews, Wilbur J., # K W, Evanston, 

Greene, Truman R., Evanston, 

Greenman, Guy, Evanston, 

Hamill, Harry, B S 77, Blunt, D. T., 

Poyer, Ulysses Grant, Desplaines, 
Shumway, Philip Raymond, B 77, Evanston, 

Adkinson, Fannie, Moore's Hill, Ind. 

Barber, Ella Ursulla, Evanston, 

Blackman, Clara Lucile, Chicago, 

Boardman, Sarah Brayton, Evanston, 

Case, Carrie, K K F, Prairie du Chien, 

Comstock, Fannie, Evanston, 

Ellis, Clara, Clinton, Iowa, 

Fisk, Aurora Thompson, A F, Evanston, 

Haw, Hattie T., A F, Ottumwa, la., 

Howell, Lillien Maud, Des Moines, 

Johnson, Georgia Edith, Dillon, Montana, 

Myers, Helen May, K K F, Evanston, 

Patten, Gertrude, Charles City, la., 

Shute, Bertha Ward, Evanston, 

Tiel, Maud Emily, Cherokee, Iowa, 

Timmons, Lydia Rebecca, Chicago, 

Thompson Emma, KKF, Evanston, 

Towle, Anna C, A $, Evanston, 

Towle, Harriet Naylor, A $, Evanston, 

Ward, May Bell, Wilrnette, 



Hamlin Street. 
1313 Chicago Ave. 
Life Saving Station. 
Union Hall Block. 
Sherman Ave. 
207 Davis Street. 
College Cottage. 
Park St., nr. Worn. Col. 
Woman's College. 
Church Street. 
Woman's College. 
Ridge Ave. 
Woman's College. 
625 Judson Ave. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Avenue House , 
College Cottage. 
French House. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
314 Chicago Ave. 
741 Orrington Ave. 
741 Orrington Ave. 
Wilrnette. 




25 



VmV^VW r v^i 








Awards for 1885. 



^ 



KIRK ORATORICAL PRIZE. 

0. C. Mars, 85. 

DEERING ESSAY PRIZES. 

D. H. Bloom. W. C. Chase. Mary Henry. 

(1. C. Mars. Mary B. Swail. 

NORTON DECLAMATION PRIZES. 

Kate M. Alling, '87. Ada M. Peart, '86. 

R. I. Fleming, '86. 

GAGE DEBATE PRIZES. 
Harvey Brown, '87. E. L. Shuman, '87. 

ADELPHIC ORATORICAL PRIZES. 

E. A. Schell, '86. R. I. Fleming, '86. 

OSSOLI ESSAY PRIZE. 
Mary E. David, '87. 

CHESS GOLD MEDAL. 
Mary Henry, '85. 

HERBARIUM PRIZE. 

Janet C. Gloss, '87. 



26 





u+ 



a 





^^^t^^k^-^^^^T^^^r^^ 



degrees and k)if>lomas. 



^r^^^r^^^f^^^f^^^r^^ 



2b 






^1885^ 






i 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 



Owen Wheaton Battey, Jr. 
David Hestor Bloom. 
William Cather Chase. 
Frank Cook. 
William Dyer Fullerton. 



Mary Henry. 

William Russell Light. 

Rush McNair. 

Gerhart Cornell Mars. 

George Abraham Mulfinger. 



Leonard L. Skelton. 



BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 



Samuel Lambert Boddy. 
Ellen Mary Sawyer. 
Kate Lucinda Sharp. 



Mary Benedict Swail. 
Nellie Frances Weeks. 
Charles Addison Wightman. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 



Edward Dunn Huxford. 
Eugene Edward McDermott. 



Charles Sumner Slichter. 
Sydney Watson. 



BACHELOR OF LITERATURE. 

Mary Eleanor Moore. 

27 



»w»^f Tw t ^fP f W f» f w f^ t wtwf^ f W f w? < ifWf W fwf y^f^ tw fW fP 1 




'■&• nnmepsa^iea 




Friday, June 12. 

Oratorical Contest for Kirk Prize, . . . , 8 p.m. 

D. H. Bloom, .... " New England Puritans.'" 

Mary B. Swail, . . " The Reformation of 18th Century." 

Mary Henry, ..." The Mission of Scepticism." 

G.C.Mars, . . "John Quincy Adams (The Representative)." 

W.C.Chase, ...... "Ireland." 

Sunday, June 14. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, . . . . . 10.30 a. m. 

President Joseph Cummings, D.D., LL.D. 

Sermon before the University Christian Association, . . 8 p.m. 

Rev. Bishop Samuel Fallows, D.D. 



Monday, June 15, 



Class Day Exercises, 

Oration, 

History, .... 

Poem, .... 

Prophecy, .... 

Examinations for Admissions, 

Anniversary of Preparatory School, 



10.30 A. M. 
. W. D. FlJLLERTON. 

Ellen M. Sawyer. 

W. R. Light. 

Kate L. Sharp. 

3 P. M. 

8 P. M. 



28 



Tuesday, June 16, 



Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 
Field Day Sports, . 
Conservatory Concert, . 



9 A. M. 
2 P. M. 

8 P. M. 



Wednesday, June 17. 

Business Meeting of the Alumni Association, . . . 2 p. m. 

Banquet, . . . . . . . 8 p. m. 

Oration, ..... Frank E. Knappen, 77. 

Paper, .... Miss Helen L. Miller, '80. 



Thursday, June 18, 



Commencement Exercises, 

W. C. Chase, 

E. E. McDermott, 

Rush McNair, 

W. D. Fullerton, 

D. H. Bloom, 

Mary B. Swail, 

G. C. Mars, 

C. A. WlGHTMAN, 

C. S. Slighter, 
Mary Henry, . 
Kate L. Sharp, 
Sydney Watson, 



. 10 A. M. 

. " Mirabeau." 

"Milton's Satan." 

" The Augustan Age." 

" Cicero— The Man." 

• Witchcraft.'' 

The Jesuits in the New World." 

" The Fall of Constantinople." 

"Henry Fawcett." 

" The Patriotism of Sumner." 

"The Alhambra." 

. " Shakespeare's Heroines." 

" The Monroe Doctrine." 




29 




Qffieers, 



President, 

1st Vice-President, 

2d Vice-President, 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, 

Critic, 

Sergeant-a t-Arms, 

Chaplain, 

Organist, 

Chorister, 



C. B. THWING. 

I. R. HITT, Jr. 

C. S. BENNETT. 

J. A. ENGELKE. 

H. CADDOCK. 

F. J. CAMPBELL. 

P. B. BASS. 

S. J. HERBEN. 

C. E. LINEBERGER. 

H. R. CALKINS. 



7V\embers, 



E. W. Austin. 
G. 0. Barnes. 
C. S. Bennett. 
P. B. Bass. 

G. A. Bass. 

F. M. Byers. 

F. J. Campbell. 
I. C. Cartwright. 
H. Caddock. 
H. ft. Calkins. 
C. C. Clifford. 
E. A. Davidson. 
C. M. Denny. 
J. A. Engelke. 
I. R. Hitt, Jr. 



J. H. Hill. 
S. J. Herben. 
H. Howell. 
J. E. Hunt. 
f. Johnson. 

H. L. KlNDIG. 

C. E. LlNEBERGER. 

S. Middlekauff. 
0. Middlekauff. 
E. C. Quereau. 
W. Raymond. 
C. L. Stevens. 
C. J. Tisdel. 
C. B. Thwing. 
R. 0. Vandercook. 



30 




Qfficers. 



President, - 

Vice President, - 

Secretary, - 

Treasurer, 

Critic, 

Chaplain, 

Serjeant-at-Arms, 



E. L. SHUMAN. 
D. H. GLOSS. 
C. H. BOOTH. 

F. C. DEMOREST. 
T. R. GREENE. 
W. H. TUTTLE. 
W. A. HALL. 



Active 7Vl ern kers, 



Atchison, H. I). 
Booth, C. H. 
Briggs, H. F. 
Brown, H. 
Demorest, F. C. 
Edmondson, S. P. 
Fleming, R. I. 
Gloss, D. H. 
Greene, T. R. 
Greene, E. B. 
Graves, C. S. 
Holden, R. H. 



* Joke ! 



Wright, C. B. 



Hall, W. A. 
Hamilton, J. R. 
Kunstman, G. W. 
Little, F. 
Leonard, H. G. 
McLennan, W. E. 
McFadden, B. M. 
Schell, E. A. 
Shuman, E. L. 
Springer, R. W. 
Tuttle, W. H. 
Weeden, B. M. 



31 



'm <9 ^ V W V ' 



li iiilffiilHiiiiiiiiiiiiiMl l H iimimi .1 • ■ ■ i ■ 

S50LI ^ <?^ 




0ffieers. 



Presiden t, - 
Vice-President, - 
Secretary, - 
Treasurer, 
Critic, 
iSergeant-at-Anns, 



MINNIE KING. 
JENNIE GLOSS. 
HATTIE TOWLE. 
LILA KEELY. 
IDA HARVEY. 
ADA PEART. 



7Wembers. 



Belle Alling. 
Kate Alling. 
Lodilla Ambrose. 
Florence Babcock. 
Nettie Brown. 
Carrie Bumann. 
Fannie Butcher. 
Henrietta Coon. 
Mary David. 
Jennie Gloss. 
Anna Groff. 
Sara Foster. 
Hattie Haw. 
Ida Harvey. 



Helen Holden. 
Lillien Howell. 
Lila Keely. 
Minnie King. 
Charlotte Lyford. 
Etta McKenney. 
Ada Peart. 
Mary Richey. 
Belle Shuart. 
Luna Stevenson. 
Mary Sumner. 
Lydia Timmons. 
Hattie Towle. 
Fannie Towle. 



Jennie Wire. 



>pv^v^wm< 



32 



WW V 




33 




DKEKA.PHI 



! 


- * f y %r a f s j - * - || 




c ^" 


^7=^ \ 


FOUNDED FEBRUARY, 1852, AT JEFFERSON COLLEGE, PENN. \ 


Colors : Pink and Lavender. • 

1 

> 


ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. ► 


Washington and Jefferson College. 


Wabash College. 


Allegheny College. 


Columbian College. 


Lewisburg University. 


Universit}* of Chicago. 


Pennsylvania College. 


Universit} T of Kansas. 


Dickinson College. 


Universit}' of Michigan. 


Franklin and Marshall College. 


Johns Hopkins University. 


Lafayette College. 


Universitv of Wisconsin. 


University of Pennsylvania. 


Beloit College. 


University of Virginia. 


Northwestern Universitv. 


Washington and Lee University. 


Carlton College. [ 


Hampden-Sidney College. 


University of Mississippi. 


Ohio Wesleyan University. 


Cornell Universitv. 


Wittenberg College. 


Syracuse University. 


Wooster Uniyersit}*. 


Hobart College. > 


University of Ohio. 


University of the Pacific. ► 


Universitv of Indiana. 


Simpson College. ► 


De Pauw University. 


University of Iowa. > 


South Carol 


ina College. ► 


ALUMNI CHAPTER ROLL. I 


Attica, Ind. 


Indianapolis. 


Baltimore. 


Kansas Cit}\ 


Chicago. 


Philadelphia. 


Columbus. 


Washington. 


Harrisburg. 


Wheeling. 

1 


Grand Arch Council convened at 


Indianapolis, April 7, 1886. > 




! 
35 1 

• 



PHI KAPPA PS I. 

Illinois Alpha 

FOUNDED 1864. 



^ratres in ||rbe. 

Charles K. Bannister. Edward L. Everingham. 

Alexander W. Clark. William M. Raymond. 

^ratres in facilitate. 
Robert Baird, Charles W. Pearson, 

(Chair of Greek). (Chair of Eng. Lit.) 

Robert D. Sheppard, George H. Horswell, 

(Chair of History and Political Econ.) (Instructor in Latin). 

Charles Horswell, 

(Instructor in Greek, G. B. I.) 

fratres iri |X n i pers i^ a ^ e * 

COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY. 

John N. Hall. Gerhart C. Mars, A.B. 

Charles Horswell, A.B. William I. Taylor, A.M., 

William E. Wilkinson, A.B. ( De pauw > 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Rufus G. Collins, Ph.B., M.D., Rush McNair, A.B. 

(Beloit). 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 
Seniors. 
Stuart P. Edmondson. L. Ormond Perley. 

Joseph H. Hill. Edwin A. Schell. 

Juniors. 
Frank J. Campbell. Winfield S. Hall. 

William E. McLennan. 

Sophomores. 
Wilbur J. Andrews. William A. Hall. 

George A. Bass. Frank Little. 

Perkins B. Bass. Charles B. Thwing. 

Charles H. Booth. William H. Tuttle. 

Freshmen. 
Frank H. Blodgett. Charles S. Graves. 

George W. Dixon. Stephen J. Herben. 

N. Adelbert Lyman. 

36 




&EO.R LOCKWOOO 8. "JON.N EW YOF 




§ f i^ma •:• ©I^i- <§ 




FOUNDED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, OXFORD, OHIO, 
JUNE 28, 1855. 



Colors : Blue and Gold. 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 

First Province. — <2> 0, University of Pennsylvania ; K, Universit}^ 
of Lewisburg ; <P, Lafayette College ; 0, Dickinson College ; Q, Penn- 
sylvania College ; A A, Stevens Institute of Technology ; A &, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 

Second Province. — W, University of Virginia ; Z, Washington and 
Lee University ; T, Roanoke College ; F I\ Randolph-Macon College ; 
2 2, Hampden-Sidney College ; A M, Virginia Military Institute. 

Third Province. — F, Ohio Wes^an University ; B x Wooster Uni- 
versity ; Z W, University of Cincinnati ; A F, Ohio State University ; 
M, Denison University ; Z Z, Center College ; H, University of Missis- 
sippi ; A N, University of Texas. 

Fourth Province. — g, De Pauw University ; A, Indiana State Uni- 
versity ; P, Butler University ; A A, Perdue University ; X, Hanover 
College ; A X, Wabash College. 

Fifth Province. — G Q, University of Michigan ; A K, Hillsdale 
College ; A A, University of Wisconsin ; A Z, Beloit College ; D., North- 
western University ; KK, Illinois State University ; A /, Illinois Wesleyan 
University. 

Sixth Province. — A H, University of Iowa ; A g, University of 
Kansas ; A E, University of Nebraska. 

ALUMNI CHAPTERS. 

£1. Chicago. Q. Cincinnati. 

I. Indianapolis. H. Lafayette. 



37 



SIGMA cm. 



Omega Chapter 

CHARTERED, JUNE 23, 1869. 



f ratres in |J[rbe. 

Merritt C. Bragdon, A.M., M.D. Dexter P. Donelson, A.B. 

James E. Deering. George Lunt, Ph.B. 

Frank M. Elliot, B.L. Henry A. Pearsons, A.M. 

Frederick D. Hesler, M.D., U.S.N. Edward H. Webster, M.D. 

Frederick D. Raymond, A.M. Sydney Watson, B.L. 

Frank M. Brewer, M.D. Charles A. Wightman, Ph.B. 

fratres in facilitate. 

CHICAGO MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

E. Wyllis Andrews, A.M., M.D. 

Nathan Smith Davis, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

fratres in {Xm uers it:ate. 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Henry L. Kindig, '86. Benjamin L. McFadden, '89. 

Ruter W. Springer, 87. Burr M. Weeden, '89. 

Edwin L. Shuman, '87. Otis M. Howard, '89. 

Herbert P. Wright, '87. Giles Hubbard, '89. 

Henry Caddock, '88. Charles L. Stevens, '89. 

H. Bert Adams, '90. 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Robert R. Edgar, '88. W. D. Jones, '87. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

J. M. Morgan. 



38 



yvy^?^f > t^vw ¥Oi r »T' 




fff^pp./ifn^i 




FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 
JUNE 23, 1850. 



Fraternity Colors : Black and Gold. 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 

University of Pennsylvania, Washington and Jefferson College, 
Franklin and Marshall College, University of Virginia, University of 
North Carolina, Lehigh University, Randolph-Macon College, North- 
western University, Richmond College, Haverford College. 



-s*s^ 



CSi 



<i 



*ft 



&>&&'■ 



rn 



39 



'■—.'■<—■'.— >*.<--'--~-'-~>'.~-*.~-*-~--*.~-*--—-'.-~-*.~-'.~ 



PHI KAPPA SIGMA. 



Upsilon Chapter. 



^^Ss^.--^5*^- 



FOUNDED AT THE NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY IN 1872. 



Fratres in |Xrbe. 



C. B. Rice, 78. 
Dr. Junius Hoag, '78. 
F. B. Dyche, '80. 
F. L. Rice, '81. 

J. S. CONWELL, '82. 

W. A. Dyche, '82. 



M. M. Gridley, '83. 
E. B. Quinlan, ex-'83. 
W. A. Phillips, '83. 
Conrad Bunn, ex-'84. 
Chas. S. Raddin, '84. 
W. D. Sargent, '84. 



f rater in facilitate. 

CHICAGO MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

Frank S. Johnson, A.M., M.D. 

fratres in |X n i vers ^ a * e « 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

* Geo. A. Cook, '88, N. W. U. ex-'88. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Albert Barnum, '87. H. L. Stillman, '86. 



Active 2Vl emD ers. 



Frank A. Draper. 
John H. Swail. 

TULLY ESTEE. 



W. D. Barnes. 
E. A. Meyer. 
E. M. Black. 



H. L. Dunlap. 



* Deceased. 



40 







w§ 





*&e ^ 



,®ta- S^ta -dp 



^ ^ 




FOUNDED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, JULY 4, 1839. 



Colors : Pink and Bliit 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 



Adelbert College. 
Amherst College. 
Beloit College. 
Bethany College. 
Boston University. 
Brown University. 
Center College. 
Columbia College. 
Cornell College. 
Cumberland College. 
Denison College. 
De Pauw University. 
Dickinson College. 
Hampden-Sidney College. 
Hanover College. 
Harvard University. 
Indiana State University. 
Iowa State University. 
Iowa Wesleyan University. 
Johns Hopkins University. 
Kenyon College. 
Madison University. 
Maine State College. 



Northwestern University. 

Ohio State University. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Randolph-Macon College. 

Richmond College. 

Rutgers College. 

Stevens Institute. 

St. Lawrence University. 

Texas University. 

Union College. 

University of California. 

University of Kansas. 

University of Michigan. 

University of Mississippi. 

University of Ohio. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

University of Wisconsin. 

University of Wooster. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Virginia University. 

Wabash College. 

Washington and Jefferson College. 

Westminister College. 



ALUMNI CHAPTER ROLL. 



1. 


Providence 


2. 


Boston. 


3. 


New York. 


4. 


Baltimore. 


5. 


Wheeling. 



6. Richmond. 

7. Cincinnati. 

8. Cleveland. 

9. Indianapolis. 



41 



10. Chicago. 

11. San Francisco. 

12. Denver. 

13. St. Paul. 



* V * W V w 



iA^A^A^*^*^! 



BETA THETA PI. 



Northwestern Chapter 

ESTABLISHED, JULY 4, 1873. 



^ratres in |Xrbe. 

Rev. F. H. Clatworthy. Wm. Treese Smith. 

I. R. Hitt. Darwin H. Cheney. 

Irving N. Queal. Frank E. Lord. 

Rev. C. H. Zimmerman. E. D. Quigley. 

Frank H. Scott. James T. Hatfield. 

Wm. 0. Shepard. Henry R. Hatfield. 
Frank E. Miller. 

f ratres in IXniuersitate. 

COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY. 

Chas. N. Zeublin, '87. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

David H. Bloom, '87. Everett A. Aborn. 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

^ratres in ^acultate. 

Prof. J. H. Long. Prof. W. W. Jaggard. 

STUDENTS. 

G. S. Cox, '87. H. S. Metcalf, '85. 

Gr. B. Hopengarner. 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Senior. 
Clinton S. Tomlinson. 

Juniors. 

Bond Stowe. Chas. G. Lewis. 

Harvey Brown. 

Sophomores. 
Harvey R. Calkins. John E. Hunt. 

Arthur R. Edwards. Edward C. Quereau. 

Freshmen. 
Harry Hamill. Clark J. Tisdel. 

Herbert F. Briggs. Frank C. Whitehead. 

Phil R. Shumway. John B. Young. 

42 










GEO R LOCKWOOD &SONNEWYORK 




T0=^- 



JNta- Sp^ilon 




FOUNDED AT WILLIAMS COLLEGE, 1834. 



Col oi' s : Blue and Gold. 



ACTIVE CHAPTERS. 



Williams. 

Union. 

Hamilton. 

Amherst. 

Adelbert. 

Colby. 

Rochester. 

Middlebury 

Rutgers. 

Brown. 

Madison. 



New York. 

Cornell. 

Marietta. 

Syracuse. 

Michigan. 

Northwestern. 

Harvard. 

Wisconsin. 

Lafayette. 

Columbia. 

Lehigh. 



43 



wmw^wmwm w 



'»^»^»^y^»«g»^»^»»^»^>»^»^»^»w»« 



^k^LJ0^J^jUk>Jk^t^d 



DELTA UPSILON. 



Northwestern Chapter. 

FOUNDED, FEBRUARY 18, 1880. 



Fratres in |X rDe - 

P. D. MlDDLEKAUFF, '82. P. S. WEBSTER, '81. 

N. C. Miller, '81. 



^ratres in Uniuersitate. 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

C. G. Plummer, '84. 

COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY. 

W. F. Atchison, '84. H. 0. Cady, '83. 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Senior. 
R. I. Fleming. 

Juniors. 
Geo. I. Larash. C. H. Brand. 

H. J). Atchison. 

Sophomores. 
Oscar Middlekauff. C. E. Linebarger. 

C. Bradford. 

Freshmen. 
F. W. Beers. Gr. W. Kunstmann. 

Fred. C. Demorest. Samuel Farley. 

Arthur E. Elmore. Robert H. Holden. 

H. G. Leonard. C. M. Denney. 

C. W. Ferguson. 



44 



v > :? 





§> mm. @ 



FOUNDED AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, SYRACUSE, N. Y., 1872. 



Colors : Bordeaux and Silver Gray. 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 



A. S}'racuse. 

B. Northwestern. 
H. Boston. 



I 



! 



45 



ALPHA PHI. 



Beta Chapter 

ESTABLISHED, MAY, 1881. 



§orores in |X rDe - 

Frances E. Willard. Carrie Calkins. 

Sorores in facilitate. 

Rena A. Michaels, Ph.D. Catharine Beal, B.P. 



gorores in Uniuersitate. 

Senior. 
Ada M. Peart. 

Juniors. 

Henrietta Coon. Frances Towle. 

Anna M. Towle. Harriet N. Towle. 

Albertine C. Wales. 



Cora L. Allen. 
Lila F. Keely. 
Lizzie Moulding. 



Stella Bass. 
Lizzie B. Edwards. 



Soj)ho?7iores. 



Freshmen. 



Helen Pearsons. 
Mary E. Sumner. 
Annie M. Swift. 



Grace I. Foster. 
Minnie Jones. 






46 



KEFHIHHZBHHEjdjdcid 



i 
1 
i 
i 
i 

U * 

1 

I 




gB asro^^HEHEHBKEgS; 



JMta • flamma, 



3fc 





^ ZgPEEEEEgHEra'^EHHF 




FOUNDED AT OXFORD, MISS., 1872. 



Colors : Bronze, Pink and Blue. 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 

W. Oxford, Miss. 

H. Buchtel. 

r. St. Lawrence. 



9. Adelbert. 

Z. Albion. 

£1. Wisconsin State. 



A. Minnesota State. 

^. Northwestern. 

A. Hanover. 

A. Mt. Union. 

X. Cornell University. 

3. Ann Arbor. 



47 



^rJ> 



DELTA GAMMA. 



Sioma Chapter 



FOUNDED, MARCH, 1882. 






^onopapj/ TVlembers. 
Alice D. Cummings. Lizzie R. Hunt, '77. 

gorores in |Xrbe. 

Sara E. White, 82. Carrie L. Hunt, ex-'85. 

Anna L. Crandon, '83. Alida Gr. White, ex-'85. 

Katherine E. Redfield, ex-'87. 

gorores in Uniuersitate. 

Junior. 
Josie B. Crandon. 

Sophomore. 
Hattie T. Haw. 



Fresh 



Aurora T. Fisk. 



Sara Foster. 



In Elocution Department. 
Camilla Ferris. 



48 



ti 



m?, 



* ffl w 



j^nuiiimiuii iTTT n giqnin 1 1 1 1 1 S 3 j j i rxx iiJUjrxxiixxiiJJjrJLi T ijix ixxjrM 

i 



.Ml F 



369 5*Sz» 



1 



i^pfa • IQsppa • ga m ma 







FOUNDED AT MONMOUTH COLLEGE, OCTOBER 13, 1870. 



Colors : Navy Blue and Light Blue. 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 

Alpha Province. — $, Boston ; B, St. Lawrence ; T, Syracuse ; 
W, Cornell ; yl, Buchtel ; F, Wooster. 

Beta Province.— z/, Indiana State ; /, De Pauw ; M, Butler ; K, 
Hillsdale ; H, Wisconsin State ; g, Adrian. 

Gamma Province. — E, Illinois Wesley an ; F, Northwestern; G, 
Missouri State ; X, Minnesota State ; 0, Simpson Centenary ; Z, Iowa 
State ; 2, Nebraska State ; O, Kansas State ; 77, California State. 



49 



»w»w» w» w^^ 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA. 



Upsilon Chapter. 

ESTABLISHED, APRIL 18, 1882. 



Sorores in {Xrbe. 

Margaret Noble. Mary S. Morse, ex-'86. 

gorores in Uniuersitate. 

Senior. 
Mary E. Van Benschoten. 

Juniors. 
Kate M. Alling. Mattie P. Hutchison. 

Sophomores. > 

Belle E. Alling. Ida T. Sunderland. 

Freshmen. 
Carrie Case. Isabelle Morse. 

Helen M. Myers. Emma Thompson. 

Ada Townsend. 



/TS 


.4 


— I — r 




i 




H- 


a 


4 ?- 


gj- 


-H- 


1 


-J. 




^- & 




-«sJ- 





^T^« 



50 



Ik. 





N ^V^td & 







Phi Kappa Psi, 



L. 0. Perley, '86. 
W. S. Hall, '87. 
P. B. Bass, '88. 
F. H. Blodgett, '89. 



G. W. Dixon, '89. 
C. S. Graves, 89. 
S. J. Herben, '89. 
N. A. Lyman, '89. 



H. L. Kindig, '86. 
H. P. Wright, '87. 
R. R. Edgar, '89. 
0. M. Howard, '89. 
G. Hubbard, '89. 



Sigma Clii. 



B. L. McFadden, '89. 

C. M. Stevens, '89. 
L. D. Wallace, '89. 
B. M. Weeden, '89. 
R. H. Harvey, '90. 



H. B. Adams, '90. 



W. D. Barnes 
H. L. Dunlap, '90. 



Phi Kappa Sigma. 

90. E. H. Meyers, '90. 

T. Estee, '91. 
J. H. Swail, '91. 



Beta Theta Pi, 

H. F. Briggs, '89. F. C. Whitehead, '89. 

P. R. Shumway, '89. J. B. Young, '89. 

C. J. Tisdel, '89. C. N. Zeublin, '87. 



Delta Upsilon. 



F. W. Beers, '89. 
F. C. Demorest, '89. 
C. M. Denny, '89. 
A. E. Elmore, '89. 



S. Farley, '89. 
R. H. Holden, '89. 
G. W. Kuntsmann, '89. 
H. G. Leonard, '89. 



P t ^f ^tW fWf^f Wf 



^T^^W^ W 



51 



OUR BABIES. 



Mary E. Sumner, 
Stella Bass, '89. 



Alpha Phi. 

38. Elizabeth Edwards, '89. 

Grace I. Foster, '89. 
Minnie Jones, '89. 



Delta Gamma. 

Sara M. Foster, '89. Aurora T. Fisk, '89. 

Camilla Ferris. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Kate M. Alling, "87. Isabel Morse, '89. 

Belle E. Alling, '88. Clara J. Thompson, 89. 

Carrie Case, '89. Ada Townsend, '89. 



Francis L. Chick, '89. 



Helen Meyers, '89. 



Emma Thompson, '89. 




52 





R RAYMOND, D.D., LL.D 
SYST. THEOL. 



THEOl 




HON. GRANT GOODRICH. 
PRES. BOARD TRUSTEES. 



ORRINGTON LU 
SEC. BOARD TRUSTEES. 




i?S^'z^'r J !=''^!=' , =' l! 

I 



Ifoffett Biblical Institute. 




Faculty. 



HENRY B. RIDGAWAY, A.M., 

Dickinson College, 1849; D.D., 1868. 
Cornelia Miller Professor of Practical Theology, and President. 



MINER RAYMOND, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1840 ; D.D., 1854 ; 
Professor of Practical Theology. 

MILTON S. TERRY, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1870 ; D.D., 1879. 
Professor of Old Testament Exegesis. 



LL.D., N. W. U., 1884. 



CHARLES W. BENNETT, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1852 ; D.D. 
($ B K). 
Professor of Historical Theology. 



Genesee College, 1870; (W T), 



CHARLES F. BRADLEY, A.M., 

Dartmouth, 1873 ; B.D., G.B.I., 1878 ; (A A $), (<2> B K). 
Professor of New Testament Exegesis. 

ROBERT M. CUMNOCK, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1868 ; (W T), ($ B K). 
Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution. 



CHARLES HORSWELL, A.B., 

Northwestern University 1884 ; (<£ K W). 
Instructor in Greek. 

WILLIAM ROLLINS, 
Instructor in Hebrew. 



53 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



(©OMMENGEMENT &5EEI^. 

May 9-13, 1886. 



Baccalaureate Sermon, . . Sunday, Ma} T 9, 10.30 a. m. 

Rev. Bishop J. M. Walden, D.D., LL.D. 

Anniversary of Missionary Society, . . May 9, 7.30 p. m. 

Inaugural Address, .... May 10, 7.30 p. m. 

Prof. R, M. Cumnock, A.M. 

Annual Examinations, .... May 11 and 12. 

Meeting of Alumni Association, . . . May 11, 3 p. m. 

Alumni Address, ..... May 11, 8 p. m. 

Rev. J. S. Chadwick, D.D., '61. 

Alumni Banquet, ..... May 11, 8 p. M. 

Meeting Board of Trustees, . . . May 13, 10 a. m. 

Joint Meeting of Trustees and Visitors, . . May 13, 3 p. m. 

Commencement Exercises, .... May 13, 7.30 p. m. 



Commencement Speakers. 



H. 0. CADY, A.B. W. C. HOWARD, B.S. 

A. F. HART. A. T. LUTHER. 

W. E. WILKINSON, A.B. 



54 



1 

< 

1 

• 

! 
! 

< 

( 

< 

< 


GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 


J 


sIASIAN LlIiPE^AF$Y 


i 
SOGIETY. 


• 


" Pro Deo et Ecclesia." 


\ ; 




Qfficers. 






President, 


- 


J. w. 


EDWARDS. 


Vice- Pre sklent, 


- 


F. W. 


GINN. 


Secretary, 


- 


F. H. 


GARDNER. 


Treasurer, 


- 


J. D. 


LEEK. 


Critic {Senior), - 


- 


C. N. 


ZEUBLIN. ; 


Critic {Junior), 


- 


G. W. 


RODERICK. 


Chaplain, 


- 


EN OS 


holt. ; 


Sergeant-a t-Arms, 


- 


W. E. 


GIFFORD. 


Chorister, 




F. H. 


TAYLOR. ; 

i 

► 

> 




55 




> 

i 



lA^A^A^A^A. 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



CQissionai^y Society, 



The w oi- Id is my parish." 



President, 
Vice President, 
Recording Secretary, 
Treasurer, 



0fficers, 



J. D LEEK. 
H. 0. CADY. 
ENOS HOLT. 
RICHARD BROWN. 






Anniversary Exercises, jVfay 9, 1SSG. 



W. F. ATCHISON, A.B., W. M. DUDLEY, B.S., 

RICHARD BROWN, J. W. EDWARDS. 



56 



i4^i^4af >i 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



O p e n i n o Day 

OCTOBER 15, 1885. 



Addresses. 

The Preacher and his Pen," . Rev. Arthur Edwards, D.D. 

Preparation for the Ministry," 

Rev. Bishop Charles H. Fowler, D.D.. LL.D., 61. 

The Minister in the Field," 

Rev. Bishop Thomas Bowman, D.D., LL.D. 

Founders Day. 

MARCH 5, 1886. 



Memorial Address. 

Rev. AMOS W. PATTEN, B.D., Class of 1870. 

Retrospect. 

Miss FRANCES E. WILLARD. 

Ode. 

Written for the occasion, by William White, of New York. 



57 



1 GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 

; 


! i 

0fficers of Senior ;G^ ass * 

i 


J President, 


. W. E. WILKINSON. 


| Vice-President, 


A. F. HART. 


1 Secretary, 


. E. J. ROSE. 


( Treasurer, 

< 


A. T. LUTHER. 




Students. 




SENIOR CLASS. 


Blue, Frank, . 


Jacksonville, N. Y. 


Cady, H. Olin, A B., A T, 


. Middlebury, Vt. 


Dudley, Willey M., B.S., 


Mapleton, Iowa. 


Hart, Alfred F., 


Ransom, Mich. 


Howakd, Walter C, B.S., 


Manhattan, Kan. 


Kamp, Henry D., A.M., 


Lowell, Wis. 


Luther, Alexander T., 


... . Carson City, Mich. 


Rose, Edward J., 


Portersville, Ohio. 


Smith, J. Hamline, 


Wilshire, Ohio. 


*Taylor, Lewis N., 


Fulton, Mo. 


Wilkinson, William E., A.B., $ K W, . . . . Evanston. 




MIDDLE CLASS. 


Baldwin, Fred L., 


. Marshall, Minn. 


Barker, John W., 


Statesville, N. C. 


De Weese, J. M., 


. Columbus Grove, Ohio. 


Dudley, Homer P., . 


Mapleton, Iowa. 


Edwards, John W., 


Alexis. 


Farquhar, Robert W., 


. Aberdeen, Scotland. 


Finley, Richard S., A.B., 


Parallel, Kan. 


Gannaway, William H., 


Charleston. 
. Thomson. 


Gardner, Frank H., 


Harmon, Josiah G., . 


Ingraham. 


Harmon, John F., 


. Ingraham. 


Hensell, George D., 


Griggsville. 


Holt, Enos, 


. Riverside. 


Horswell, Charles, A.B., 


<P K W, . . . Armstrong Grove. 


Huston, John W., B.S., 


Graham, Mo. 


Kinney, Melvin, 


. Mt. Carroll. | 


Knuckey, James T., 


Scales Mound. > 


Lee, Nathan H., 


. Flora. 1 


Leek, John D., 


. Buttonville, Ont. 

. . . . Sussex, Wis. 


Lean, John S., 


LUNDEOARD, ELLERT J., . 


Farsund, Norway. 


* Deceased. 




58 > 



< GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE 
t 


> 


< 


> 


Marcellus, Edward F., . 


. Brock, Neb. 1 


McDole, Azor, ...... 


Edna, Kan. > 


Moore, Oliver T., 


. Tyron, Neb. j 


Norton, Niram F., B.S., 


Rowley, Iowa. 


Olsen, Joseph, ...... 


Norway. 


Pelley, Ebenezer G, . 


Niagara Falls, Ont. 1 


Pierce, Reuben E, A.B., . 


Centralia. > 


Pierce, William H., A.B., .... 


Centralia. | 


Rhodes, Wellington P., A.B., 


Denver, Col. 


Reuter, William C, 


Bethany, Mo. ► 


Rollins, William, ..... 


. Yorkville, Wis. J 


Reynolds, John, ...... 


. Parker, D. T. > 


Roderick, George W., . 


Galion, Ohio. j 


Saunders, Albert, ...... 


. London, Ont. 


Smith, Robert T., 


Sheldon, Mo. 


Taylor, William I., A.M., £ K W, 


Richardsville, Ky. 


Van Pelt, John R., A.M., .... 


Bloomington. 1 


Weir, Samuel, 


Otsego Lake, Mich. | 


Woods, Jesse S., . 


. Evanston. 


Zeublin, Charles N., B & LJ, 


Chicago. 


JUNIOR CLASS. 




Anderson, Gilbert, .... 


. Chicago. 


Atchison, Wilbur F., A.B., A T, . 


Evanston. 


Bannister, Carlton, A.B., 


Nyack, N. Y. i 


Baskerville, Emanuel J., B.S., . 


Baldwin, Kan. ] 


Boardman, J. Stanton, ..... 


Olean, N. Y. 


Bowder, Henry J., A.B., ..... 


Rowley, Iowa. 


1 Brayton, Fred C. B., . 


Blue Island. 


Brown, Richard, ...... 


Georgetown, Wis. 1 


Burdick, Francis A., 


. Parker, Dakota. j 


Carlton, William Washington, A.B., Ph.B., . 


Clear Lake, Iowa. 


Carlyon, Richard, .... Sault Ste. Marie, L. Sup. 


Cattermole, Edward George, ... 


Vermillion. 


Cissel, Cassius C, 


Corunna, Ind. 1 


; Graig, Robert H., ...... 


Gray Co., Ont. ] 


Dawson, Ralph H., 


Mound City, Mo. j 


Derby, George, ...... 


Newark. 


Dewhirst, Andrew, ..... 


. Clay Co. 


Doble, William, ...... 


Chicago. 


Pox, Ernest L., A.B., ..... 


. Fullerton, Neb. » 


Fretts, Joseph R., A.B., . 


Stoners, Penn. ^ 


Gaddis, Eugene S., . . . . . 


Dayton, Ohio. 


Gifford, William E., 


Evanston. 


Ginn, Frederick W., . 


Vail, Iowa. 


Hall, John N., £ K W, 


Evanston. 1 


Hamerson, John, ...... 


Wall Lake, Iowa. \ 


Henderson, J. Ezra, ..... 


Arkona, Canada. J 


59 





GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



JUNIOR CLASS— Continued. 



Johnson, James Albert, 

Kemp, John C, 

Kendrick, Milton H., 

Kopp, William, 

Lumpkin, Albert M., A.B., 

Mars, Gerhardt C, A.B., # K W, 

Northrup, Frederck H., A.B., 

Parker, Murray S., A.B. 

Patterson, Edmund Booth, A.B. 

Peck, Alva B., 

Perry, Enoch, 

Place, Chester A., . 

Poland, John H., 

Porritt, Charles, 

Reid, John Wesley, 

Ryder, George M., . 

Scarrow, David H., 

Shambaugh, William, 

Shaw, James R., . 

Simmons, Albert N., A.M., 

Simmons, Charles W., A.B., 

Simpson, William H., 

Symons, Edgar J., 

Smith, Abner Clapp, 

Smith, Julius, B.S., 

Stangland, Egert M., 

Sweatt, Frank E., M.D., 

Taylor, Frank H., . 

Tippett, James H., 

Trezona, Henry, 

Villars, Ulysses S., 

Worrall, Charles Wesley, 

Warren, Edward D., 

Washburn Dewitt C, B.S., A.B. 

Winmell, Richard Morris, 

Wolff, Edward L., . 

Young, James, 

Yuasa, Kichro, 



Gainesville, Texas. 

Montezuma, Intl. 

Sycamore. 

Newark, N. J. 

Sharon, Kan. 

Galena. 

Beloit, Wis. 

Richmond, Md. 

New Buffalo, Mich. 

Woodhull. 

Bristol, Wis. 

Earlville. 

Stanberry, Mo. 

. Orion, Mich. 

Lindsay, Ont. 

Woodstock. 

. Mt. Forest, Ont. 

Osawatomie, Kan. 

. Kerwood. 

Jersey Co. 

Brookville, Iowa, 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Camborne Academy, Eng. 

. Kansas City. 

Savannah, Mo. 

Evanston. 

Willsborough, N. Y. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Central City, Col. 

Scales Mound. 

Clinton. 

Chebanse. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

, Dak. 

Keithsburg. 

Tapley, Ont. 

Annaka, Japan. 



60 



l*fcA«fc^OA^Al 



I 



GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE. 



<£♦ "B« !• W^^hington'$ «girih<iag ^tebraiioru 




Who was the first man ? "— (G. B. I., Feb. 22, '86.) 



61 



VVf «f 



'W f W ? W?^»WtW? Wf» ?W? WtW ?WTW fW T W ?W 



In jfltaoriam. 



X. m. ^aglor, '88. 

(Oarrett biblical institute.) 

Died September 22 , 1885, 



as. at. Cook, ee, 

(Chicago ZlDeMcal College.) 

lied ^pril 8, 1686 



62 




E. C. DUDLEY. 



JOHN E. OWENS. 




■^^^^ ^^wmMi^mz&r^z&te^z^ 



6 



LLEGE-OF| 




M 



EDICINE. 



yacultj/*. 



N. S. DAVIS, M.D., LL.D., Dean. 

EDMUND ANDREWS, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Treasurer. 

H. A. JOHNSON, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

RALPH N. 1SHAM, M.D. 

J. H. HOLLISTER, A.M., M.D. 

J. S. JEWELL, A.M., M.D. 

E. 0. F. ROLER, A.M., M.D. 

SAMUEL J. JONES, M.D., LL.D. 

MARCUS P. HATFIELD, A.M., M.D. 

LESTER CURTIS, A.M., M.D. 

E. C. DUDLEY, A.M., M.D. 
JOHN E. OWENS, M.D. 
OSCAR C. DeWOLF, A.M., M.D. 
JOHN H. LONG, Ph.D. 

W r ALTER HAY, M.D., LL.D. 

FREDERICK C. SCHAEFER, M.D. 

CHRISTIAN FENGER, M.D. 

W. E. CASSELBtiRRY, M.D. 

W. W. JAGGARD, M.D. 

I. N. DANFORTH, A.M., M.D. 

A. G. PAINE, A.M., M.D. 

FRANK BILLINGS, M.D., Secretary. 

F. S. JOHNSON, A.M., M.D. 



63 






^ftkago HU^dJkal $*II«g«. 



(The 



,, HE archives of the Chicago Medical College contains an interesting 
-J historical document in the first records of the Facult}'. The first 
entry is as follows : 

"At a meeting held March 12, 1859, at the office of Drs. Rutter 
and Isham, the following named gentlemen were present : David 
Rutter, M.D. ; H. A. Johnson, M.D. ; Edmund Andrews, M.D., and 
Ralph N. Isham, M.D. It was announced, in a few words, b}^ Dr. 
Johnson, that the object of the meeting was to organize a Medical 
Faculty of the Lind University, on the basis of a proposition made 
by the trustees of said University, and submitted to the above named 
gentlemen for their consideration." 

The Faculty was organized, N. S. Davis, M.D., J. H. Hollister, M.D., 
and five others being added, making the original Faculty of eleven 
members. 

These gentlemen, without appreciation, syrnpatlry or support from an 
indifferent profession and an apathetic public, united in a determined 
struggle to establish a medical school — the first of its kind in the United 
States — with a graded and consecutive course of instruction, extending 
through a period of three 3 T ears. 

Brilliant success has crowned the efforts of the eleven innovators. 
The influence of the institution in the cause of higher medical education 
has been distinct and profound, and now the leading schools all over the 
land are gradually falling into line. 

It the year 1869 — relations with the Lind University having been 
terminated by mutual consent — Chicago Medical College became the 
Medical Department of Northwestern University. 

Status Praesens. — The character of the work now being done in 
the institution under consideration is indicated in some degree by the 
result of the last annual competitive examination for internes at the Cook 
County Hospital. Eight vacancies in the Hospital Staff were to be filled. 
Twenty-eight candidates presented themselves, seven of whom were from 
C. M. C. After a severe, though strictly impartial examination, lasting 
through two days, the examiners awarded six positions to the candidates 
from Chicago Medical College. 

With the prestige of a glorious past, a complete Faculty of energetic 
medical men, a corps of one hundred and forty well-prepared and enthu- 
siastic students, a powerful Alumni Association, new and commodious 
buildings, chemical, histological, physiological and pathological labora- 
tories, the clinical material of Mercy, St. Luke's, Michael Reese Hospitals 
and the South Side Dispensary, Chicago Medical College bids fair to con- 
tinue to "flourish, bloom and bear fruit." 

64 




Nathan $mifh 7>airi$, J}.j>-, ££!>., 

DEAN OF CHICAGO MEDICAL COLLEGE, 

AS born in Chenango Count}', N. Y. His earl}' life was spent on 
a farm, and his elementary education was obtained in a district 
school. His manifest love for books led to his being sent to a 
seminary where he laid the foundation of his scientific studies, which were 
further pursued in the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Western 
New York. After three years spent in the study of medicine he began 
the practice of his chosen profession in Vienna, N. Y. ; but soon went to 
Binghamton, a larger and more flourishing place. He remained there, 
obtaining a large practice and a most honorable reputation in the com- 
munity, until 1847, when he removed to New York City. Within two 
years he acquired a good practice, received the honorable recognition of 
his professional brethren, and was appointed Demonstrator of Anatomy in 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons. In 1849, being elected to the 
chair of Physiology and Pathology in Rush Medical College, Chicago, he 
removed to that city, where he has resided and labored constantly for 
thirty-seven years. The following year he was made Professor of Princi- 
ples and Practice of Medicine. He has always been an advocate of a higher 
medical education ; was one of the founders of the Chicago Medical Col- 
lege, whose reform movement bids fair to revolutionize medical education 
in America. He has been constantly, both editor of and writer for medi- 
cal journals, and has published a number of valuable books, the last and 
most valuable being " Principles and Practice of Medicine." 

He is the acknowledged founder of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, which is the great national medical organization of the country ; has 
been honored with its highest offices, and its bronze medal bears on one 
side the face of Dr. Davis, and upon the other, "American Medical Asso- 
ciation, 1846." 

Little idea can be obtained of the work done by this untiring man. 
From 6 o'clock a. m. till 12 at night are his regular hours. The hours of 
the day are spent in attendance upon the sick, the hours of the night in 
writing. He is loved by his host of friends, revered by his patients, and 
honored by all. Since youth he has been an earnest Christian, and a 
teacher of morality and temperance, both by precept and example. 



65 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



M/ 



'86. 



/IN I ^ \ I . /I\ 



(^~k GOODLY company of sturdy and intelligent manhood were the 

(Ah fellows that for the first time, September 23, 1883, filled the 

<~+J \^^- amphitheatre of the Chicago Medical College. Sturdy and 

intelligent they were, yet, withal, as motley a company as ever 

came together. Chaucer's pilgrims at the Tabard Inn were not more 

varied in character than thej\ 

It was a cheerful class, an ambitious class ; and it was not to its dis- 
credit that sometimes in a mirage, at the horizon, it saw an eminent com- 
pany of physicians and surgeons, which resembled, to a remarkable 
degree, the individual members ; and a few who lived away up among the 
haughty hills of the intellect could see themselves reflected in heroic pro- 
portions upon the cloud-banks of the Future, a phenomenon not unlike 
the aerial shadow known as the Specter of the Brocken. 

The first year we had no class organization, but at the beginning of 
the middle term, feeling the need, we elected the following officers : G-. 
A. Wood, president ; C. G-. Rankin, vice-president ; P. J. Taugher, secre- 
tar}^ and treasurer. 

The second year was busy enough, to be sure. How the work piled 
up until the class thought that one straw more would " break the camel's 
back." The one straw more was added, however, and relief was sought 
in the usual way, by petition. A committee ascended Mt. Olympus and 
tried to spread out its complaint, but Dr. Davis, to use Homeric phrase, 
" spake and gave the nod with his dark brows ; " or, in the words of one 
of the suppliants, " he sat down on them." 

Jokes and bons mots, some of them winged ones, were in the air these 
years. Of course the odor of sulphuretted hydrogen was occasionally 
upon them. 

The third year opened with goodly addition to our number. In due 
time the evening for election of class-officers arrived. The ballots made 
a happy choice. Marble's name for president ; Smith's, for vice-president, 
and Taugher's again, for secretary, awakening cordial applause. At the 
close of the same meeting, the class, recognizing the marked ability of Mr. 
Hibbard, unanimously voted that he should say " vale " for them on 
Commencement Day. 

Commencement Day came, and the motley company, like Chaucer's 
pilgrims from the Tabard Inn, set out upon its way. 



66 



i — - > 

» 
COLLEGE OE MEDICINE. j 

> 


> 
> 

(Llass of JLigKtijOipc. ; 

> 




i 
0fficers. [ 


W. H. MARBLE, - - President. 


E. M. SMITH, - Vice-President. 


P. J. TAUGHER, - - Secretary and Treasurer. ! 


W. N. H1BBARD, - Valedictorian. 


H. S. METCALF, - Historian. I 


7W em bers. ! 


> 

Brand, M., .... . Chicago, 111. 


Brannon, George, 




Lowell, Ind. 


Brennon, D. F., 










. Chicago, 111. > 


Broel, A. C, 










Dubuque, Iowa. 


Calkins, F. W., 










. Rockford, 111. ; 


Cowdrick, E. E., . 










Napoleon, Ohio. [ 


Easter. C H, 










Chicago, 111. 


Fleming, C. K., . 










Chicago, 111. 


Fredendall, G. W., . 










. Washington, Kan. J 


Froom, A. E., 










Chicago, 111. 


Hale, A. B., W T, 










. Chicago, 111. ' 


Hanna, E. A., 










Chicago, 111. | 


Henry, F. H., 










. Chicago, 111. 


Hibbard, W. N., A.M., 2 $, $B I 












Hyde Park, 111. > 


Hurie, E. J., . 












. Newmansville, 111. 


Jenks, F. H., 












Piano, 111. 


Marble, W. H, A.B., A H W, 












. Ashburnham, Mass. > 


Markley, P. L., . 












Archibald, Ohio. 


Martinitz, S. von, 












Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Normal, 111. > 


McCormick, M. K., A.M., # A (-), 












Metcalf, F. H., 












. Jacksonville, 111. 


Metcalf, H. S., A.M., B S 77. 












Mt. Carrol], 111 


Miner, H. N., . 












. Colfax, Cal. > 


Nelson, J. W., B.S., 












Collins, Wis. 


Pickard, W. 8., 












. Champaign, 111. 


Plummer, C. G., B.S., A T, 












Evanston, 111. \ 
. Rock Island, 111 


Plummek, S. C, B.A., 












Rankin, C. G., A.B., 












Glastonberry, Conn. 1 


Rogers, F. W., 












. Jackson, Mich. ] 


Sauerhering, D. L., 












Mayville, Wis. 


Sincere, M , 












. Chicago, 111. > 


Smith, E. M., 












Cascade, Wis. J 


Steinbach. John, 












. Milwaukee, Wis. 


Taugher, P. J., 












Osman, Wis. » 


Thomas, J. S., B.S., . 












. Reedsburg, Wis. 


Wang, A. M., A.B., Ph.B., 












Chicago, 111. 


Warrington, L. P., A.B., 












Ludlow, 111. > 


Wood, George A., 


Chicago, 111. 

> 


67 1 


• 


> 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



*= ='8 7.= =* 



Sept. 28. The class of '87, flushed with victory, return to pitch their 
tents — and pennies — in the domain of " Whack'em " and " Slaughter." 
Sept. 29. The neighborhood, aroused to unusual activity. " Uncles " 
erect their marts of exchange, where, but a short time before, the 
pensive william goat munched in peace the succulent stove-pipe. 
Oct. 1. The class meets and organizes. Peace reigns. The patrol 
wagon returns empty as it came. 

Brougham substitutes North Side vinegar for Aqua Regia. 
Smedley's new theon T of " Foetal Development from Odonto- 

5." 

Hodges buys a hundred trip ticket to Morgan Park. 
Jones gets malicious anaemia of the pocket-book. 
Greensfelder makes a new incision for Colotomy. 
Hillmantel dreams of ghosts in Schlitz Park. 
Pratt cracks a joke. Building fully insured. 
Cox resumes his clinics at the " Dime Museum." 
Courtright gets hypertrophy of the 4th ventricle. 
Miller holds a spiritual seance in the dissecting room. 
Eddy and Schoonmaker join the Salvation Army. 
Connell presented with an automatic hair brush. 
Smith lectures on "The Value of Colparysis in Dental Caries." 
Wesley — Essa3 T on "Organs in Hot Alcohol." 
Rogers — Surgical operations from a religious stand point. 
Schener gets shaved. Jaques gets the " Dispensary." 
Nembula discovers a new sugar test. 

" Dies Lsetitiae " — C. L. A. — Fern. Sem. — Bibs — Laws — Medics 
W. (J. 

Wing refuses to pass the facultj' on their quiz record. 
Clark lectures on " Hair Restoratives. 

Hall shows Prof. Long through the " Glucose Factory." 

Taylor (E. P.) gets vaccinated. Classical areola. 

Jackman tells his famous story about the French actress. 

McNair experiments with amoeboid movements. 

Riese — New method of " Paralysis by Owens." 



68 



Oct. 


5. E 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


blasts 
19. 


Oct. 


26. 


Nov 


2. 


Nov 


7. 


Nov 


16. 


Nov 


20. 


Nov. 


23. 


Dec. 


5. 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


25. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


25. 


Feb. 


10. 


Feb. 


22. 




— N. 


Feb. 


24. 


Feb. 


28. 


March 5. 


March 9. 


March 15. 


March 17. 


March 20. 



COLLEGE OF MEDLCLNE. 


> 


CLlass of EightyOevea. 




0fficers. 




W. S. HALL, - - President. 


I 

> 


A. A. WESLEY, - - - Vice-President. 


W. K. JAQUES, - - - Secretary. 


> 


J. P. CONNELL, - - Treasurer. 


F. C. ROGERS, - - - Sergeant-at-Arms. 


i 

> 


B. L. RIESE, - - Historian. 


> 


7V\embers. 


» 
» 


Bailey, W. G.. . Chicago, 111. 


Black, C. E., B.S., 






Jacksonville, 111. 




Broughham, E. J.. 










. Chicago, 111. 




Clark. W. B., 










Worthington, Perm. 




CONNELL, J. P., 










. Osman. Wis. 




COURTRIGHT, C. W , 










Chicago, 111. 




Crist, J. C, . 










. Coffee, Ind. 




Doepp, W. L., 










Chicago. 111. 




Eddy, J. S , . 










. Cold Creek, Col. 




Egloff, W. J., 










Mason City, Iowa. 




Fredigke, C. C., 












. Chicago, 111. 




Greensfei.der, L. A.. 












Chicago. 111. 




Hall. W. S , $ K W, . 












. Ayr, Neb. 




HlLLMANTEL. J. L., 












Milwaukee, Wis. 




Hodges, F. J., B.S., . 












. Chicago, 111. 




Jackman, F. 0., 












Bloomington, 111. 




Jaques, W. K., Ph.B., 












. Dubuque, Iowa. 




Jones, W. D., 2 X, 












Pawnee, 111. 




Kennedy, C. F., 












. Rockford, 111. 




Kerr, E. E.. 












Springfield, 111. 




Lawther, F. H., 












. Columbia, Mo. 




McNair, R., A.B., $KW, 












Kalamazoo, Mich. 




Miller. S. E., . 












. Liberty Center, 0. 




Nembula, J. M., . 












Natal, Africa. 




Pratt, H. E, . 












. Saltville, Kan. 


i 


Redelings, T. J., . 












Niles, 111. 


> 


Riese, B. L., . 










. Chicago, 111. 


Rogers, F. C, <£ A &, 










Milwaukee, Wis. 


» 


Scheuer, M. M., 










. Chicago, 111. 




SCHOONMAKER, F. H., 










Joliet, 111. 


Smedley, N. J., 










. Belvidere, 111. 


> 


Smith, G. R., 










Bloomington, 111. 




Taylor, E. P., . 










. Berlin, Wis. 


* 


Taylor, J. G., 










Boston, Mass. 


• 


Turner, B. S., 










. Chicago, 111. 


> 


Wesley, A. A, A B., 










Chicago, 111. 


i 


Whitfield, G. W., 










. Chicago, 111. 


> 


Wing, H. B., A.B., 




Chicago, 111. 




69 





COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



MA 



'88. 



/IN C ^ < ^ . /l\ 



Cfra 



HE first authentic account we have that the class of 88 had material- 
ized was when its embryonic doctors assembled in the upper lecture 
room on the evening of the 22d of September, 1885. It was a 
motley crowd. The poor freshies went to the lecture room with trepida- 
tion, thinking freshdom in the medic involved barbaric initiation, such as 
prevails in other forms of college life, but their fears were groundless. 
That there never was in the Chicago Medical College a better looking 
class of saw-bones can be proved by our entire class. Our Professor of 
Anatomy often said the same, or like it, but as he referred only to our 
osseous and muscular development, and never spoke of our cerebral size 
or quality, we took the compliment with a grain of salt. 

The class feeling the responsibility of doing good work, devoted all 
the time to study when not busy smoking. The result of over-stimulation 
to work caused the once plethoric looking boys to become so atrophied 
and anaemic that the people on the street would now and then mistake 
one for a "stiff," of which some of the muscles were not yet tetanized. 

Our class did not have its brightest and pleasantest times in raising 
class money, even for objects of common interest. In the third year of 
study a sub-doctor rarely retains sympathy between his purse and its 
pursuers. When men have imbibed at the Pierian spring, and have 
become plethoric with study, and are asked for spondulics, say for a ban- 
ner or an annual, they are apt to turn up their noses, secundum artem, 
and say, with neither meekness or diffidence, "Be ye gone, ye proto- 
plasmic, infinitesimal, atomic globules of insubordination," and so we 
would retire without a nickle or a blessing. 

The material of our class combined much of the conventional. It also 
had some originality, as for example, marking the absences of a lecturer 
and going to labor with him. The term was not half gone till the class 
had passed examinations on such test questions as these : What is the 
color of red oxide of mercury ? Is it nicotine or the gastric juice that is 
secreted in the mouth ? What is the relation of Etiology to Osteology ? 
The class was harmonious, so much so that they voted, with but one 
dissenting voice, to give a copy of their countenance to the professors, 
and if they had the power they would have voted to themselves degrees 
ad eundem, and, as to qualification, they would do, as we saj- on the silver 
dollar, " Trust in God." 

# 
70 



COLLEGE OF MEDICIXE. 



Class of £ighty*£ight. 



0ffieers, 



THOMAS E. COLE. 
WILLIAM H. PARKER, 
CHARLES H. MAYO, . 
DANIEL N. EISENDRATH, 
THOMAS J. RUDE, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Sergeant-at-Arms. 



7V\embers, 



Bemis, Edward Augustus, - 

Booth, George Christian, B.D., 

Brown, Everett Josiah, 

Carriel, Henry Buttolph, B.S., 

Cole, Thomas Edward, 

*Cook, George Albert, # K 2, 

Cunningham, G. K., - 

Eddy, Julius Henry, 

Edgar, Roberto Ricardo, 2 X, 

Eisendrath, Daniel Nathan, - 

Fisk, Eugene De Loss, 

Gray, Frank Frederick, B.A., 

Gregory, Luis Lincoln, A.B., 

Hancock, Joseph Lane, - 

Hougen, Ole T., 

Hunt, Frederick Richard, 

Ives, Charles Gustin, 

Johnson, Charles Whitmarsh, A.B. 

Keeney, James Finley, B.S., 

Kuh, Sidney, 

Lippoldt, C. H., 

Marvin, Earl Leach, 

Mayo, Charles Horace, 

McIntyre, Charles William, - 

Miller, Harry Lovette, 

Montezuma, Charles, B.S., 

More, Charles Wesley, 

Morgan, James Jacob, Ph.B., - 

Morton, Edward Campbell, 

Palmer, Orange Stephen, 

Parker, William H, 

Phillips, George Samuel, 

Rude, Thomas Jefferson, - 

Ruthenberg, Erick Bemis, 

Sadlier, Harry S , - 

Schuman, Oliver Valandingham, 

Storer, Willis Daniel, 

Treadwell, C. S., 

Wagner, Charles Brentano, 

Walker, J. F., 

Whitney, Henry Charles, - 

* Deceased. 



Plymouth, Wis. 
Chicago, 111. 
Decatur, 111. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Champaign. 111. 
Mendota, Wis. 
Columbia, Mo. 
Janesville, Wis. 
Buenos Ayres, S. A. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
River Falls. Wis. 
Rockford, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
St. Nazianz, Wis. 
Paw Paw. 111. 
Byron, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Chicago, III. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Rochester, Minn. 
Pontiac, 111. 
Hyde Park. 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Janesville, Iowa. 
Chicago, 111. 
Ft. Bridger, W. T. 
Chicago, 111. 
Oswego, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Burden, Kan. 
Chicago, 111. 
Gowrie, Iowa. 
Columbia City, Ind. 
Madison, Wis. 
Chicago, III. 
Chicago, 111. 
Ontario, Canada. 
Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 



71 



A^A^A^A^Ai 



COLLEGE OF MEDICLNE. 



<£x«r^i$^$ at $♦ $♦ M u$ ^* m > 



1. Prayer by Bro. Jaqoes (limited to thirty minutes.) 

2. Mr. Bailey will then laugh (very hard) for ten minutes at nothing in 

particular. 

3. Mr. Whitfield follows with a learned dissertation on " How to Bun 

the Faculty." 

4. There will next be a contest between Messrs. Smith and Egloif, to 

see who can expectorate more tobacco juice inside of five minutes. 
The winner to receive a fine nickle plated spittoon. 

5. Visitors may now examine our fine collection of curiosities, which 

have been obtained at great expense. Among others (in glass 
cases to the left) : Little Jones and his big " Plug " hat ; the 
wonderful, long, blonde hair taken from Mr. Bedding's coat, etc. 

6. Mr. Clark (our challenge wonder !) will then be introduced and will 

immediately proceed to turn red all over (a remarkable feat.) 

7. Mr. Connell will read a paper on " Malicious Anaemia." 

8. Mr. Jackman (special request) will assume one of his patent 

" poises," and look wise, 

9. Senior Hurie kindly volunteers information on " How to Pass Prof. 

Sam Jones." 

10. Miller (from Ohio) will give us the "History of Wesley and the 

Ill-will of Dr. Starkey." N. B.— Amply illustrated. He will 
have the classical s}<ringe, hole-in-the-wall, water-basin, gas- 
stove, etc. 

11. Informal discussion on "Dogs." How to obtain, etc. 

12. Two little Juniors will now be led in. They will cry for ten minutes, 

when they will be given 3i Tinct. Opii Camphor, and turned loose 
and allowed to destroy property. 

13. All visitors will now be requested to evaporate, as the Middle Class 

will go into session, Mr. Hall in the chair. Speeches will be 
made on — nothing, with — nothing in them, by Messrs. Hodges, 
Turner, McNair, Whitfield and others. 

14. Supper and benediction. Survivors will be pensioned according to 

gravity of injuries. 



72 




J 



HURD. 




MARSHALL D. EWELL. 




—e$_@y 



pllege of 




^£& 




^f^^ 



Faculty. 

Hon. HENRY L. BOOTH, LL.D. 
Hon. WILLIAM W. FARWELL, A.M. 
Hon. MARSHALL D. EWELL, LL.D. 
Hon. HARVEY B. HURD. 
NATHAN S. DAVIS, M.D., LL.D. 



73 



'^w^w^w^rw* 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 




CLASS OF '86. , 

* Bistorj/\ 

dHE Class of '86 embarked upon the fathomless depths of 
3 the Law upon the 19th day of September, 1884. It is at 
^!L present composed of fifty-two individuals, all males. At 
the close of last term, however, we had with us one feme- 
covert and a feme-sole. The feme-covert has fled to the 
bosom of her family ; the feme-sole, alas ! sized us up and 
departed — both knocked silly by the overwhelming intricacies of 
the Law. I torn amid the turbulent wrangling of Politics, '86 
has naturally an antagonistic and warlike disposition. It has 
already knocked out one elevator man, driven a second to suicide, and is 
fast rendering a third non compos mentis. 

Among other interesting events of the 3 r ear was the trespass of a 
horse (?) upon Prof. Ewell's eye, but — " Be minimis non curat lex.' 1 The 
class showed its great brain and vastness of its intellectual calibre at its 
recent election of Associate Judges to the Moot Court Bench. From 
Wilson — the leanest, lankest, skinniest of mankind — it skipped with one 
might} 7 bound to the Goliah-like Bradwell. "Wilson eats no fat and 
Bradwell eats no lean," with such a Jack Spratt arrangement (if they 
were given a fair show) the Moot Court Bench would be licked clean of 
every scrap of injustice or partiality. 

The lectures upon the "Romahny Civeely," b} T the German called 
Zeisler, have not been largely attended by the members of '86. The 
members of the class will recollect that one of the interesting offspring of 
Miller, the man who went to the funeral, took this man Z. for his much 
respected honor Herr Blackstone. God bless Miller and the kid ! 

* Quoted from Syllabus of '85. 



74 



~> 



iO^^AI 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 



Since last year the Class of '86 has made neither progress nor his- 
tory. It is a question whether she has climbed the hill of learning to 
such a height that no communication can reach us ; or whether, in cross- 
ing the field of knowledge she has stuck in the mud of egotism, and, like 
a burr in a calf's tail which is borne along by the calf, the only move she 
has made was involuntaiy. The year rolled around and she moved 
with it. 

Sic transit gloria mundi ! 

Hie jacet '86 ! Editors. 




75 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 



+^+ 



CLASS OF 87 

m — — 4-^#— — $ 




JN the beginning there was chaos, and smoke — cigar smoke — 
in the fourth floor "loft" on Dearborn street. The fiat 
went forth. The nicotine-loaded vapor curled graceful^ 
out the window, and, without further ceremony, the Class of 
'87 was in esse. Although born in a somewhat elevated position in 
society — about four floors above the common thoroughfare of life, 
although somewhat difficult to approach — because of an extremely con- 
servative and laborious elevator, the infant class is not proud. It is not 
of " pre-Adamite ancestral descent ;" it cannot trace its ancestiy back to a 
" protoplasmal, primordial, atomic globule ; " but in its humility and 
novelty it is proud of its plebeistic, cosmopolitan composition. Here 
upon a common footing, and in accordance with common law principles, 
are assembled the African, the Teuton, the Israelite, the Saxon, the 
Hibernian, the Melodramatic Divine, u Sir/' the feme-covert and feme-sole. 
Here with an intensity of earnestness positively painful, and with a 
fertility of eloquence strangely novel, fundamental principles of juris- 
prudence are discovered and discussed to an extent hitherto unknown in 
the annals of our college histon*. The Class of '87 is an anomaly in 
comparison with the long list of its staid and sober predecessors ; it is at 
once an inspiration and revelation to the faculty, elevator boy, fruit vend- 
ors, and the better part of Dearborn street ; it is a creature equally of 
fate and circumstance, sui generis in composition and Athena-like in 
origin. It is a phenomenon, an interrogation point, a sine qua non to the 
future standing of the bar. In short, Nature outdid herself in its crea- 
tion, and, Uranus-like, stands aghast at her own offspring. Here, hidden 
beneath the mawkish exterior of school boy or office clerk, are many a 
Kent or Coke. Here — but modesty will not permit us to say more. 
Ours is a tale that is quickly told. Such is the present. What the 
future may be non sum informatus. 

Historian. 



76 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 



BRIEFS. 

V>t -JVC 

Prof. Ewell. — "I've got a little list — I've got a little list." 

Revell. — "He made hay of his hair after he said this, and he stood 
a-tiptoe." 

Tachey. — "The sports of children satisfy the child." 

Green. — " Put it on the board." 

Wm. H. Morgan. — " Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow." 

Huston. — " I don't quite see that, professor." 

McKee. — Yes, sir, — Professor, sir, — I think, sir, — that is so, sir." 

Prentiss. — " I am, in point of fact, a particularly haught\' and exclusive 
person, of pre- Adamite ancestral descent. You will under- 
stand this when I tell you that I can trace my ancestry 
back to a protoplasmal, primordial globule, consequently 
my family pride is something inconceivable. I can't help 
it ; I was born sneering." 

Bloom. — " The flowers that bloom in the spring, tra la, have nothing to 
do with the case." 

Miss W. — " With no one near to sooth or aid, 

But that inspired and wondrous maid." 




77 



■ *. ~. *> ~- *■ ~. *■ ~> ~ — ■ 




gam jfrat^rnitB 



FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1870. 



Colors : Wine Color and Pearl Blue. 



ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL. 

Kent — University of Michigan. 
Benjamin — Illinois Wesleyan University. 
Story — Columbia College. 
Booth — Chicago Law School. 
Cooley — St. Louis Law School. 
Pomeroy — University of California. 



78 



WTWTW^TW^TWy^TW^^T^yW^^y 



< 




> 


! PHI 


DELTA PHI. 


1 




1 




> 
1 

\ 

► 

1 

> 


i Booth 


c 


H A PT E R. i 

1 


j ESTABLISHED, 1877. 




^ratres i 


n 1X r D e - 


S. G. Abbott. 




A. K. Manning. 


F. L. Brooks. 




W. A. Paulson. 


G. W. Cass. 




J. J. Read. 


F. L. Douglass. 




F. H. Scott. 


E. B. Felsenthal. 




H. C. Van Schaak. 
A. D. Wheeler. 


Judson F. Going. 




Adolph Lund. 




W. F. WlEMERS. 


Edward P. Maher. 




J. E. Babb. 


G. E. Porter, 




Jas. A. Burhans. 


L. C. Ruth. 




Edmund S. Cummings. 


Samuel D. Snow. 




H. G. Fitch. 


F. W. Walker. 




Harry Geohegan. 


Walpole Wood. 




F. A. Helmer. 


0. E. Anthony. 




J. A. May. 


L. C. Brooks. 




M. W. Pinckney. 


Henry N. Cooper. 




G. M. Rogers. 


Joseph Fitch. 




Edward A. Small. 


J. H. Glade. 




L. Weinschenk. 


Martin M. Gridley. 




G. F. White. 


Louis 


A. McDonald. 


T^etiue 7Vl ernDers in 


the genior Qlass. 


J. W. Anthony. 




Wm. McKinney. 


A. B. Camp. 




A. S. J. Magruder. 


H. B. Hubbell. 




Loyal L. Smith. 


Geo. L. Land. 




A. J. WlLLMARTH. 


F. H. McCulloch. 




Frank H. Clark. 


E. F. Runyan. 




Charles W. Fisk. 


S. A. Walther. 




Thomas D. Knight. ) 


Frederick A. Bangs 




Frank McDowell. > 


Allan B. Forbes. 




Grant Newell. J 


Frederick P. Hopkins. 


H. W. Stillman. 




7£ 


> [ 



»-^*^**-^£^* s -^Sa^**-^^' 



?i\ Conservator 



*-^£^-:- ->f^»-:-.r**^.: ^^ 




OREN E. LOCKE, 

University of Leipsic. 
Director of Conservatory of Music. 

JAMES GILL, 

University of Leipsic. 
Instructor in Vocal Culture, Singing and the Italian Language. 

JOSEPH SINGER, 

Instructor on the Violin and Viola. 

PETER C LUTEIN, 

Instructor on the Piano and Organ. 

W. WARREN GRAVES, 

V.A.S., Peterselea School of Music, Boston. 
Instructor on the Piano and Organ. 

C MONTGOMERY HUTCHINS, 

Instructor on the Cornet, Clarionet, and Band Instruments. 

ROBERT M. CUMNOCK, 

Wesleyan University, 1868. 
Professor of Elocution. 

HENRY S. CARHART, 

Wesleyan University, 1869. 
Professor in Physics. 



80 



>y< P T vj ¥ w ywy w 



^y^»^yw^w»wyw^w^w*w^w»' 



* I * ^ * *> * 




Qfficers, 



President, - 
Vice-President, 
Musical Director, - 
Recording Secretary, - 
Corresponding Secretary, 
Treasurer, 
Chaplain, - 
Sergeant-at-Arms, 



ROBT. 0. VANDERCOOK. 
ANNA J. HENDERSON. 
CHAS. E. LINEBARGER. 
HOWARD M. DUFFEL. 
BELLE SHERIDAN, 
HARRIET G. BURDICK. 
MINNIE E. KING. 
FRED CHAPIN. 



T^ctiue 7Vlembers of J[,mpbonian Society. 



Florence Bailey, 
Anna R. Burnett, 
Mabel G. Edinger, 
Nettie A. Goodrich, 
Anna J. Henderson, 
Alice C. Hart, 
Grace Hindman, 
Hattie L. Humbert, 
Georgie Johnson, 
Minnie E. King, 
Anna Millar, 
Lizzie G. Rye, 



Robert 0. 



Belle Sheridan, 
Cora V. Snyder, 
Emma Thompson, 
Frank H. Blodgett, 
Fred Chapin, 
Howard M. Duffel, 
Ernest Hoag. 
H. B. Judson, 
E. Larson, 

Chas. E. Linebarger, 
Laverne Nickel, 
Eugene Shutterly, 
Yandercook. 



81 






^••tf^aii 







CI 



1-1-1" K- 



professor. 

ROBERT M. CUMNOCK, Wesleyan University, 68. 

7Vlembers. 

CLASS OF '86. 

Mamie Blackman, Irene M. Martin, 

Anna J. Henderson, M. Ada Peart. 



CLASS OF '87. 



Mrs. H. M. Ames, 
H. Louise Bailey, 
Nettie L. Brown, 
Myrtle B. Cole, 



J. Gr. Scorer. 



Lona A. David, 
Camilla B. Ferris, 
G. S. La Rue, 
Julia S. Nichols, 



SPECIAL PUPILS. 

F. W. Beers, Belle Shuart, 

W. A. Hall, P. H. Shumway, 

W. E. McLennan, Almeda J. Soper, 

E. J. Ridgeway, C. B. Thwing, 

C. A. Phillips, W. H. Tuttle, 

W. 0. Sheppard, C. S. Tomlinson, 

E. A. Schell, Nellie Williams. 



82 





* £RT. * 



Z 



W 




director. 

Catharine Beal, B.P., Syracuse University, 76. 



Students. 



Cora Allen, 
Emma Bullis, 
Miriam Baker, 
Emma Blake, 
Edith Call, 
Jessie Coe, 
Lelia Crandon, 
Helen Cragin, 
Laura Copeland, 
Lillian Howell, 
Grace Hindman, 
Nettie Jones, 
Laura Keeney, 



Florence McKinney, 
Fanny McCord, 
Gracia McWilliams, 
Minnie McGee, 
Leonora Panushka, 
Emma Prindle, 
Lizzie Straight, 
Anna Swift, 
Mary Straley, 
Lydia Timmons, 
Louise Whitehead, 
Clara B. Logan, 
Laura Holderman. 




83 



■^TTTTT^ TT TT'i n rTT?r»T* 1 .JIX|IT KX* M ** ITII I lIIII Tirillllf fill III TTI 




Natural Histerg 




r=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jp=Jr=Jr=ir= Jr=ji — ir==-ii — ir=»r=Jr=Ji — ■ r=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jp=Jr=Jr=Jr=I 
M — L- 1 — - L - , — > — ' ■— '— - 1 - mfi ,L. L_L_ r~;r— j_ 1_|, ^= „ l „„!:„ ll |,„.„ 



faculty. 

OLIVER MARCY, LL.D, 

Deering Professor. 

MARSHALL D. EWELL, LL.D., 

Instructor in Microscopy. 

CHARLES B. ATWELL, Ph.M., 
Preparatory Instructor. 



Rooms, 



Lecture Room, 
Biological Laboratory, 
Preparatory Lecture Room, 



No. 19 University Hall. 

No. 18 University Hall. 

Preparatory Building. 



7Vluseum 



This occupies the whole of the upper floor of University Hall, 
90X70 feet, with the exception of two rooms. A part of this space is 
finished eighteen feet above the floor. It accommodates the skeleton of a 
whale, which is forty feet long, and the skeleton of an elephant, which 
stands eleven feet high. Horizontal glazed cases with drawers occupy 
the floor. Glazed wall cases surround the rooms and alcoves. The total 
amount of shelf room and drawer room is unknown, but all the shelves 
and drawers are full. 



84 



>¥W TWT wy wTWV ^ v ^» ^¥ W¥ W» o ywy w¥ w v wT W ¥w ywy^ T ^i >wf ?» ¥ ' 



c± 



DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL HISTORY 



The material is arranged in the following departments : 

1. Anthropology. 

2. Zoology (Recent). 
S Botany (Recent). 

J/.. Palaeontology (Both plant and animal). 

5. Lithology. 

6. Mineralogy. 

All the sub-divisions of Zoology and Palaeontology are well repre- 
sented, and the material is labelled and arranged in systematic order. 

^be I^iological laboratory 

Occupies a room 36x20. It is furnished with work tables, an aquarium 
and cultivating tanks. It has ten compound microscopes by the best 
makers and with the most recent improvements. 




85 



1 



m PREPARATORY 1 



■*& 



ik Department. ® 



Faculty. 

HERBERT F. FISK, A.M., 

Wesleynn University, 1860 ; ( £ N S), {$B K). 
Professor, and Principal of Preparatory Department. 

JOSEPH L. MORSE, A.M., 

Wesleyan University, 1859 ; ( £ N &), ( <£ B K). 
Instructor in Greek and History. 

GEORGE H. HORSWELL, A.M., 

N. W. U., 1879; B. D., G. B. I., 1882 ; ( $ K W). 
Instructor in Latin and German. 

CHARLES B. ATWELL, Ph.M., 

Syracuse University, 1879 ; {A K E ). 
Instructor in Physics. 

HARRIET A. KIMBALL, Ph. B., 

N. W. U., 1883. 
Instructor in English. 

MERRITT E. TAYLOR, Sc. M., 

N. W. U., 1883. 
Instructor in Mathematics. 



86 



PRE PA RA TOR Y DEPA R TMENT. 



^^Y{r^^^ 




philomaihia S*ter*rg Soei^iy. 






' -'-■■■-' ' ' V" ... ' 




C^-^4 / ^^ 



0fficers, 



President, 

Vice-President, 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, . 

Ambassador, 

Critic, 

Sergean t-at-Arms, 

Chi plain, . 



W. J. JEFFERY. 

I. EDDY. 

C. M. STARKWEATHER 

L. R. KINNEAR. 

F. A. RICHARDSON. 

W. L. WICKMAN. 

J. McCONNELL. 

J. S. GRAHAM. 



W. J. Jeffery. 

W. L. WlCKMAN. 

F. A. Alabaster. 
J. F. Clancy. 
F. I. Collins. 



7V\embers. 

THIRD YEARS. 

J. V. Clancey. 
J. P. Davis. 
E. W. Erickson. 
J. P. Grier. 
R. P. Martin. 
J. H. Odgers. 



R. Breeden. 

E. J. Batten. 
C. A. Bush. 

L. R. KlNNEAR. 

C. M. Starkweather 
I. Eddy. 

F. A. Richardson. 
J. S. Graham. 

D. F. Green. 



SECOND YEARS. 

W. I. Thomas. 
M. C. Waddell 
H. B. Hall. 
A. T. Hauser. 
R. C. Harker. 
J. D. Henry. 
T. Kemp. 
F. M. KlNDIG. 
E. J. Ridgway. 
W. C. Stowe. 



FIRST YEARS. 
W. W. Batcheller. J. J. Guthrie. 

E. F. Hayslip. 0. D. Ferguson. 

G. P. Sturgess. J. J. Cole. 

M. B. Sherman. J. McConnell. 

M. L. Wilson. 



87 





- - * — 

• 
PRE PARA TOR Y DEPAR TMENT. 

. ... 


< 

( 

; $ ^ 
LITERARY SOCIETY. 

4 SP ' & 




0fficers. 


<&&&&&<&& 


i President, E. SHUTTERLY. Chorister, 


C. T. WATROUS. 


J Vice-President, H. C. DAVIS. Organist, 


L. NICKLE. 


Secreta 


ry, J. H. SWAIL. Sergt-at-Arms, 


W. D. BARNES. 


i Ass' 1 1 Secretary, J. M. WEBER, Chaplain, 


W. H. GIBBS. 


J Treasurer, J. L. RICE. Editor, 


C. T. WATROUS. 


Critic, 


H. E. BEEKS. Assistant Editor, R. M. PE ARCE. 




Ambassador, S. E. CRAWFORD. 






7V\embers. 




* 


THIRD YEARS. 




j | 


W. D. Barnes. J. H. 


Kevan. 




H C. Davis. E. A. 


Meyer. 


i 


F. A. Draper W. E 


Reynolds. 




W. Humphrey. E. Shutterly. 




H. L. Dunlap. 






88 


~ 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



SECOND YEARS. 



J. Adee. 
H. E. Beeks. 
T. C. Estee. 
W. H. Gibbs. 
W. C. Gigg. 
A. Haskins. 

T. HOLLINGSHEAD. 

E. Larson. 



L. A. Rogers. 
J. L. Rice. 
R, M. Pearce. 
T. C. Schulze. 

J. H. SWAIL. 

C. T. Watrous. 
J. M. Weber. 

W. C. Wyman. 



FIRST YEARS. 



E. W. Bacon. 
C B. Booth. 
A. Burton. 
G. A. Calkins. 
S. E. Crawford. 
W. F. Henderson. 

J. T. HlITTENDORF. 



C. C. Johnson. 
E. H. Lyford. 

J. McGlNNIS. 

J. Nelson. 
G. Roughton. 
C. S. Traver. 

L. NlCKLE. 



Quartette. 

J. L. Rice. E. Shutterly. 

H. E. Beeks. J. M. Weber. 

E. A. Meyer, Director of " Quartette" 




89 




President and Professor. 

ALBERT ERICSON, '58 ; Stregnas College, Sweden. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



0. F. LlNDSTRUM, 

Charles Paulson, 

Gr. A. ASKLING, . 



C. A. Anderson, 
J. A. Forsberg, 
Pehr Frost, 
Haldor Hanson, 
Peter Munson, . 



C. J. Anderson, 
Ludvig Ellison, 
Frank Gustafson, 
F. Oscar Logren, 
August Larson, 
Carl A. Seaburg, 
Frank Swanson, 



MIDDLE CLASS. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Lake View. 
New York. 
Menekane, Wis. 



Ishpeming, Mich. 
Atwater, Minn. 
Trade Lake, Wis. 
Ishpeming, Mich. 
West Hill, Neb. 



Chicago, 111. 
Moline, 111. 
Ishpeming, Mich. 
Boston, Mass. 
Redwing, Minn. 
Omaha, Neb. 
West Hill, Neb. 



90 



'wy ^f^ t t itw * ** 1 



&$^& Norwegian and T>amsh s^^ffgr 



-* ^h^otegieal $«ho^I. 



# 
$ 



President and Professor. 

Rev. N. E. SIMONSEN, B.D., '80 ; Northwestern University. 



Students, 



C. G. Andersen, 
Alex. Andreasen, . 
H. Christofersen, 
J. A. Jacobson, 
Isaac Johnson, 

E. J. LtTNDEGAURD, . 

L. J. Olsen, 
Alfred Pettersen, . 
E. M. Stangland, 
Rasmus Wilhelmsen, 



Evanston. 
. Evanston. 

Whitewater, Wis. 
. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Chicago. 
. Farsund, Norway. 

Bergen, Norway. 
. Bergen, Norway. 

Evanston. 
. Neenah, Wis. 



' w w m w m V mw ' mw ■ 



91 



'W f Of ^ t^fOTWy 



I 



Religious 




SOCIETIES, 



Students Christian i\$$ociation. 



ORGANIZED, JANUARY 24, 1880. 



Qfficers. 



President, 
Vice-President, 
Recording Secretary, 
Corresponding Secretary, 
Treasurer, 
Organist, - 



H. L. KINDIG. 
M. ADA PEART. 
S. J. HERBEN. 
C. A. PLACE. 
ALBERTINE C. WALES. 
H. D. ATCHISON. 



Young Worfiap's ]V[i$$ionary Society 



Officers. 



President, 

1st Vice-President, 

2d Vice-President, 

3d Vice-President, 

Recording Secretary, 

Corresponding Secretary, 

Treasurer, 



CARRIE BUMANN. 
MARY DAVID. 
ADA M. PEART. 
ANNIE SWIFT. 
GRACE FOSTER. 
LILA KEELY. 
MATTIE HUTCHISON. 



Membership Roll, Fifty-Nine. 



92 



$h«teh ^f u <£ko <£gm/' 



\[ HE neat and commodious building which stands just out of the reach 
I of the waves that wash the campus, and which is alike familiar to 
Senior, to Prep and to Fern Sem as the Gym, is a very useful and 
tangible proof of the fact that the genuine college spirit and push exist- 
ing at Northwestern ten } 7 ears ago is not to be discounted by any that we 
have now. Dr. Fowler, the President at that time, seemed to have a 
knack of arousing an interest and love for the institution, and part of 
this enthusiasm took definite shape when, in October, 1875, William G. 
Evans and Frank M. Elliot issued a circular setting forth a project for 
building a gymnasium. The scheme found support, and, as a result, a 
stock compan}^ was organized under the laws of the State, bearing the 
name of the Northwestern Uuiversity G3 T mnasium Association. The 
incorporators were W. G. Evans, F. M. Elliot, F. M. Taylor, F. M. Bristol, 
A. W. McPherson and J. A. J. Whipple. The capital stock was $4,000, 
issued in shares of $10 each ; $1,400 were raised by the sale of stock, 
which was taken almost exclusively by students. A contract was let for 
a building 40 x 80 feet in dimensions, with brick basement and frame 
superstructure. The men who had the project in charge meant business ; 
especially was Fred. M. Taylor indefatigable in the cause. Some one 
remarked at the beginning, " Gymnasium aedificandum est ; " the rest of 
the school must have responded to the tune of "So Say We All of Us," 
for the building was formally opened for use on February 1, 1876 — that 
is, in two months less time than it takes to open a new edition of the 
Syllabus, formally or informally. A set of bowling alleys were built 
and donated b}^ the local chapter of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. For lack 
of funds, the walls of the building had not been finished off outside or in, 
and in 1881, mostly through the efforts of George Lunt, the stockholders 
were induced to donate their stock to the University, on condition that 
the latter should veneer the building with brick, assume all debts of the 
association, and maintain building and apparatus in good repair thence- 
forth, for g} T mnasium purposes only. In 1882 Dr. Cummings induced 
the trustees to spend the money necessary to fulfill, this agreement, and 
also helped the students with encouragement, and with a hammer as well, 
to put the smooth-wood casing on the walls and ceiling of the interior. 
In the last few years the amount of apparatus has been gradually 
increased, principally D3 7 means of the funds from the athletic exhibitions 
gotten up by Prof. Philip Greiner, the present gym director. In fact, the 
gymnasium has kept pace with the other departments of the school, and 
every student of N. W. U. has a right to air his vanity a little once in a 
while on the subject. 

94 



>^^A^^AA-Aj 



EEciHcl'EHcS Fdi 




^ ^^ g H^E^EE^E^ ^^^ 




Prof. Philip Greiner, . . . . . Instructor. 

Formerly of the Y. M. C. A. Gym., Newark, N. J. 

The following is a list of the leading gymnasts in general all-around work : 

G. W. Greenman. R. W. Springer. 

W. C. Raymond. R. Vandercook. 

F. C. Schulze. A. E. Elmore. 

F. Little. H. Caddock. 

F. W. Beers. G. I. Larash. 

W. A. Hall. F. W. Alling. 
E. Smackels. 



^ug of W) ar T earn » 




Greenman, 
Hall, 



of ^ar J>«txo««n Y« 

N. W. U. won first pull. 

Y. M. C. A. won third pull 
* Waddell pulled in Hall's place, Hall being injured. 



Vandercook, 

McLennan, 
Greiner. 

[• S- ft- ♦* GMoasfo ait* tf. W- U« 

Y. M. C. A. won second pull.* 



95 



7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 
12. 
13. 



field Qa\f. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 1885. 



BY THE N. W. U. ASSOCIATION. 

E. E. McDermott, '85, ...... Marshal. 

JUDGES. 
Prof. Greiner. Prof. Baird. 

Prof. Horswell. 



1. Quarter-Mile Run A. D. Welton, '89 Time not taken. 

2. Climbing Rope W. A. Hall, '88 37 feet 6 inches. 

3. Hundred Yards Dash A. D. Welton, '89 10i seconds. 

4. Putting Shot, 15 lbs W. A. Hall, '88 27 feet 8| inches. 

5. Running High Jump J. E. Hunt, '88 4 feet 10 inches. 

6. Standing Broad Jump F. Little, '88 11 feet 3 inches. 

Sack Race, 100 yards R. R. Edgar, '89 32 seconds. 

Fancy Bicycling W. C. Wise, '90 No time. 

One-Mile Run J. H Odgers, '90 5 minutes 10 seconds. 

Three legged Race, 50 yds. J G. A. Bass, '88 { 

and return ( H. Caddock, '88 j" ' 

Tug of War '88 over '89 1 minute 5 seconds. 

Tug of War '87 over '88 1 minute 20 seconds 

Base-Ball Throwing A. D. Welton 315 feet. 



,17 seconds. 



W)estern Qollege Incise I^all J^eague, 



MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 



University of Wisconsin. 
Beloit College. 



Racine College. 
Northwestern University. 



OFFICERS OF '86. 



President, 
Vice President, 
Corresponding Secretary, 
Recording Secretary, 
Treasurer, 



B. Stowe, '87. 
G. A. Bass, '88. 
H. Caddock, '88. 
B. L. McFadden, 
J. L. Rice, '91. 



DELEGATES TO LEAGUE CONVENTION. 

Frank J. Campbell. F. G. Middlekauff. 

BASE BALL NINE. 

Stowe, r. f. Parker, s. s. 

Lucas, 2 b. Rice, c. 

Middlekauff, c. f. Zeubltn, I. f. 

Substitutes. 
Kern. Lemoyn. 



Lewis, p., Captain. 
Austin, 3 b. 
Curtis, 1 b. 



96 



A^^^A^AOA^, 



U« S- C^ e S av ^ n S G revN3 ' 



Lawrence 0. Larson, 

No. 1, H. L. Kindig, '86. 
No. 2, T. R. Greene, '87. 
No. 3, C. H. Booth, '88. 



Captain. 

No. 4, G. W. Greenman, '87. 
No. 5, J. Nelson, '92. 
No. 6, H. Caddock, '88. 



R. VO. U. Football Gle^en. 



H. Hamill, 



Captari 



RUSHERS. 
R. I. Hitt, F. M. Byers, 

O. MlDDLEKAUFF, E. J. RlDGWAY. 

QUARTER BACK. 
F. Waugh. F. C. Whitehead. 

HALF BACK. 
S. MlDDLEKAUFF. C. N. ZEUBLIN. 

GOAL WATCHERS. 
C. L. Morse. D. H. Gloss. 

SUBSTITUTES. 
J. H. Tippitt. C. Clifford. 



R. VO. U. Gun Giub. 



Motto : " Niimquam animus, sed ignis via. 



OFFICERS. 



N. A. Lyman, . 
W. D. Barnes, 
F. I. Collins, . 
H. Howell. 
F. H. Blodgett 



President. 

Vice- 1 'resident. 

Treasurer. 

. Secretary. 

Gen. Manager and Freight Agt. 

The Club meets annually at Rockton. 

For good conduct and sobriety refer to the Sheriff of Winnebago County. 



97 



ywT ^f W T WfW f wyy? 



R. VO. U. Bicycle Glub. 



OFFICERS. 



Prof. Robert Baird, A.M., 

P. B. Shumway, 

N. A. Lyman, 

F. H. Blodgett, 

H. L. Dunlap, 

W. C. Wise, . 



MEMBERS. 



Prof. Robert Baird, A.M 
P. B. Shumway, 
N. A. Lyman, 
F. H. Blodgett, 
Geo. P. Ciiappell, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Captain . 

Bugler. 

Treasurer. 

Secretary. 



H. L. Dunlap, 
W. C. Wise, 
B. M. Weeden, 
F. Whitehead, 
W. F. Henderson. 



Cawn tennis G^b 
I. M. S. 



Motto : "An office for every member. 



Frank Whitehead, A. I. W. 
Minnie Jones, C. H. C. 



Phil. Shumway, C. L. H. E. E. 
Ada Townsend, P. C. E. 



■P f Of W ' 



Prof. BAIRD, - - Surgeon- General. 




Gladiatores ^ulnerati. 



H. F. B. 
F. W. B 
L. A. B. 
W. E. G 
0. M. H 
H. G. L. 
N. A. L. 



s. 
. s. 

R. 
.D. 
.D. 
D. 

. .N. 



B. M. W n. 

H. C k. 

H. R. C s. 

I. C. C t. 

S. H. M f. 

G. 0. R n. 

B. 0. V k. 



99 



"Jtfft«Hft«W€*«8KIP#*.'' 



Object: "Huts, Nonsense and Negotiosity." 



IVLOTTO: "THE WOODS IS FULL OR THEM. 




Maxima Magistraitness Ceremoniarum, 
Supreme Irrepressible Presiding Genius, 
Geheimschreiberin Generale, 
Lord High Wily Schemer, 
Grand Arch Butternut Scansor, 
Incessant Sauserin le Baril, 
High and Lofty Tumbleoversome Teeterarch, 
Lord High Everything Else, 



Frances Towle. 
F. J. Campbell. 
Katharine Redfield. 

0. MlDDLEKAUFF. 

P. B. Bass. 
Lila F. Keely. 
C. B. Thwing. 
S. J. Herben. 



Committee on Turnstiles, Turntables and Turnips : 



Harriet N. Towle. 



Belle E. Alling. 



Committee on Candy, Dates and Candidates : 

Albertine C. Wales. Annie M. Swift. 

Committee on Water, Walnuts and Weddings 



Helen M. Pearsons. 



Annie Towle. 



F. Little. 
H. Atchison. 
C. H. Brand. 







GRAND 


HIGH 


PRIVATES. 


Cora 


Allen. 




C. 


H. 


Booth. 


Grace 


I. 


Foster. 




w. 


A. 


Hall. 


Lizzie 


W 


Moulding. 




w. 


E. 


McLennan 



100 



^ A^A^fcA^ A, 



Musical 




||ocieiies 



Gollege G h o ir - 

H. D. Atchison, Organist. Helen M. Pearsons, Alto. 

Belle E. Alling, Soprano. Forrest W. Beers, Tenor. 

Kate M. Alling, Soprano. Henry Caddock, Tenor. 

Mamie E. David, Alto. Frank J. Campbell. Basso. 

Daniel Bonbright, Honorary Basso. 

K W Orchestra. 

W. A. Hall, 1st Violin. F. H. Blodgett, Clarionet. 

N. A. Lyman, 2d Violin. F. Alabaster, Cornet. 

F. J. Campbell, Pianist. 



BSn 0cbestra. 

John E. Hunt, 1st Violin. Harvey R. Calkins, Tuba. 

C. N. Zeublin, 2d Violin. H. F. Briggs, Jewsharp. 

Bond Stowe, Comet. Harvey Brown, Kazoo. 

Clark J. Tisdel, Piano. 



^be Rarl TVl 06 ^" 10111 " Quartette. 



Frank Little, 

First Tenor. 

Chas. B. Thwing, 

Second Tenor. 




Gerhart C. Mars, 

First Bass. 

Frank J. Campbell, 

Second Bass. 



101 



'^y^^w^' 



**>-; 



Sl 



(T 



99 



J2 



•vS 



rH«- 



MOTTO: "GLUCOSE AND MOLASSES CANDY. 



H. M. M., 
V.-H. M. M., 
G. &, 
W. M. £., 



Miss H. M. Pearsons, 88. 
C. B. Thwing, '88. 

F. W. Beers, '89. 



Miss L. Moulding, '* 



INITIATES. 



Miss G. I. Foster, '89. 
Miss B. E. Alling, '88. 
C. H. Booth, '88. 
H. B. Calkins, 88. 

Miss L. F. Keely, '88. 
S. J. Herben, '89. 



P. B. Bass, '* 



Semi-Annual Reunions in May and October. 



! fltt 



&%Qv 



&%%%¥%%&? t 



«g<^ia Chapter, <£$iaMi$h<&<l, jfebruary S, \%%4>< 

Colors : Green and Yelloiv. 

MOTTO: "EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY." 

YELL: MICE! 



gorores in JXniuersitate. 

Junior. 
Matilda Polly Hutchison. 

Sophomores. 
Cora Lowizy Allen. Maria Euphemia Sumner. 

Lila Felicia Keely. Annie Mehetabel Swift. 

Lydia Bridget Timmons. 

Freshmen. 
Estella Hephzibah Bass. Caroline Quintilla Case. 

In Preparatory. 
Alameda Jerusha Soper. Ethelda Susannah Eddy. 

In Conservatory. 
Anna Zenobia Millar. 



102 



*-£*J^*-^f^-i 



*-^*^*-^*^^^ks^.t^H^*^i^-^ 



<^^^~f 



^ C ^tozdenb jp^ess, 



..^^-^..^"^^.i 



^>!^^>^»^^*^-*^*^-* ! 



^be Northwestern. 

The Northwestern is a 24-page magazine, published fortnightly, under 
the auspices of the Adelphic, Hinman and Ossoli Literary Societies, and 
in the interests of the students of Northwestern. It is on a prosperous 
financial basis, and is now in its sixth volume. 

BOARD OF MANAGEMENT. 

Editor-in-Chief, - - Edwin L. Shuman, '87. 

Business Manager, - - David H. Gloss, '87. 

Ahimni Personals. 

Stephen J. Herben, '89. 

Literary. Locals. 

Truman R. Greene, '87. Herbert P. Wright, '87. 

Lila F. Keely, '88. Helen M. Holden, '87. 

Exchanges. 

Charles E. Linebarger, '88. 



T^e 7Yl usica l Register. 



The Musical Register is published quarterly by the Conservatory 

of Music. 

EDITORS. 

Oren E. Locke. C. B. Spencer. 

Established, June, 1881. 



The Syllabus. 

Published by the Fraternities and Soroses of the College of Liberal 
Arts, Northwestern University. 



103 



<!,h^ £im^ KiI R Qlvfo. 



" The early bird catches the worm. 



Grand Worthy Provider, 

Chief Engineer of Vommisery Dept. 



Hash Lifter Kindig. 
Guileless Odity Richardson. 



Password , 

High Ace of Clubs, 

High Jack of Clubs, . 

King of Hearts, . 

Right Bower, 

Left Bower, 

Joker, . 

Deuce (of a fellow) 

(Non-progressive) Poker, 

Scorer, 

Grand Bouncer, 



Officers. 

Cut to right and deal to the left." 

Wild Howler Tuttle. 

Ferocious Gooseberry Middlekauff. 

Sauer Craut Davis. 

Sad Hearted Middlekauff. 

Gormandizer Greenman. 

Carnivorous Bradford. 

Jaw Pulverizer Grier. 

Hang-On Cady. 

Waffle Jerker Jeffrey. 

Fike Eater Little. 



Committees. 

Committee on Hen-Roosts. 



Rev. Samuel Weir. 



Rev. Isaac Johnson. 



C. S. Graves. 



E. W. Austin, . 

F. A. Richardson, 



Rev. Abraham Mulfinger. 

Committee on Old Maids. 

E. C. Page. 
J. R. Nelson. 

Committee on Amusements. 



Dime Museum. 

The Conservatory Game. 



Common 7Vl em kers. 



F. A. Alabaster. 

G. A. Bass. 

J. A. Engelke. 

C. W. Ferguson. 

D. H. Gloss. 



T. R. Greene. 
J. E. Groves. 
W. E. Neely. 
E. M. Stangland. 
W. L. Wilson. 






104 



^J> 



i^A^A^A^A^Al 



» • » •<• ! 



<< 



ftoI4-®n" ^Iub. 



" Water, waiter ! Wafr you waiting Wound here for ? " 



Qfficers. 



Steward and Bum Bouncer, 

President, 

Frame Climber, 

Beef Steak Wrestler, - 

Chestnut Man, 

Fritter Gobbler, 

Punster, - 



R. H. HOLDEN. 

F. J. Campbell. 
F. W. Beers. 
C. J. Tisdel. 
M. E. Taylor. 

Gr. W. KUNSTMANN. 

S. J. Herben. 



* 



-«•- 



44 



Root gog o* 7>iV ^Iub. 



Qfficers. 



President, - 
Scribe, - 
Joker, 
Punster, 
Chaplain, - 
Sergeant-a t-Arms, 



Waddell. 
Haskin. 
Hamilton. 
McConnell. 

KlNNEAR. 

Abbott. 



105 



^> 



'^MENU^- 



SOUP. 
Dog Ear. Cat Fur. Whalebone. Cobweb. 

FISH. 

Skinned Polliwog. Pink-eyed Bullheads. 

Bow-legged Shark (caught in Rubicon). 

COLD DISHES. 

Hail Pattee. Cracked Ice. Raw Iceberg. 

Blasted Glacier. Blue Grindstone. 

ROASTS. 

Buffalo, a la Robe Sauce. Chicken, forty-eight years old. 

Crow, stuffed with Rubber Boots. Pony, a la Crib Sauce. 

Goat, Buttered Ends. Pig, stuffed with Squeal. 

Cow, a la Zimmerman. Cat, stuffed with Bootjacks. 

GAME. 

Old Sledge. Base Ball. Presbyterian Billiards. 

Hot Hand. Faro. Methodist Euchre. 

Purgatory. Poker. Lawn Tennis. 

Whist. Old Maid. Keno. 

TONGUE. 

Mother-in-law Tongue. Curtain Lecture. Prep Oration. 

Tongue Tied. Son-in-law Sass. Bib Volubility. 

ENTREES. 

Umbrellas, Rainwater Sauce. Broiled Bed Bugs, Coal-Oil Sauce. 

Spiders' Toes, Breaded. Buzzard's Eyebrows on Half-ShelL 

Stewed Cat, Boston Style. Soaked Corn Cobs. 

Woolen Sox, Dipped in Glue. Dried Apples, Warm Water. 

Broiled Flies, in Molassses. Celluloid Collar (very tuf). 

Horse Blankets, Fricasseed. Busted Suspenders. 

VEGETABLES. 

Soft Corns. Onions, al a Pete Johnson. 

Corn Cribs (for Freshmen). Potatoes, Rolled in Clothes Line. 

Corn Cobs. Decayed Cabbage (Soph's delight). 

Beans, a la Holden. Dead Beats. 

Boiled Hair Brushes. 

PASTRY. 

Greek Root Pudding, Baird Dressing. Cork Screw Cake. 
Cussed Hard Pie, Left-handed. Flax-seed Pudding, Mucilage Sauce. 

Sawdust Pudding. Printers' Pi, Devil's Dressing. 

Ground Hog Pie. Sanded. Coal Scuttle Dumplings. 

Cross-eyed Pudding. Crushed Sidewalk. 

DESSERT. 

Banana Peel. Mashed Finger Nail. Kicked Dog. 

Door Jam. Crushed Angle-worm. Toe-nail Parings. 

FRUITS, NUTS, ETC. 

Snow Balls. Boiled Acorns. Sour Grapes. Red Flannel Caramels. 

Fish Balls. Doughnuts. Chestnuts. Candy Dates. Croquet Balls. 

FLUIDS (Extra). 

Bug Juice. Fire Water. Eye Water. Bluing. Hair Oil. 

Lake Water (Evanston). Mucilage (with stick). Castor Oil. 

Sour Mash a la Fern. Sem. Concentrated Lye. 

106 



—^^^^J^r- 




At Ottumwa, Iowa, October 8, 1885, Miss Mary Bonnifield, ex-'87, 
to Mr. Frank C. Hormel, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

On August 23, 1885, at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Miss Katharine B. 
Stoneman, ex-'84, to Prof. J. H. Long, late of N. W. U. 

On July — , 1885, in Wisconsin, Miss Emma P. Meserve, '81, to 
Mr. B. B. James, '81. 

On September 14, 1885, at Muscatine, Iowa, Miss B. C. Jarvis to 
Mr. D. V. Jackson, 79. 

On September 8, 1885, at Wilton Center, 111., Miss Stella Beedle, 
ex-'87, to Mr. C. A. Place, '86. 

On May 12, 1885, at Lincoln, Neb., Miss Cleve Lamb, ex-'88, to Mr. 
W. A. Green. 

At Geneseo, 111., May 20, 1885, Miss Edith Dunham, ex-'86, to Mr. 
W. H. Foster, ex-'85. 

On October 13, 1885, at Kalamazoo, Mich., Miss Victoria S. Taylor 
to Mr. Henry B. Hemenway, '79. 

At Elroy, Wis., on October 6, 1885, Miss Lizzie Morper to Mr. C. W. 
Darrow, '82. 

On November 4, 1885, at Hampton, Iowa, Miss M. L. Shabacher, 
ex-'87, to Mr. B. S. King. 

At Ottumwa, Iowa, on December 8, 1885, Miss Minnie Haw, ex-'85, 
to Mr. R. A. McPherrin, '82. 

On , at , , Miss Nellie Ballard to Mr. E. L. Cole- 
man, ex-'86. 

107 



ym w m v mw^ w wi 



At Chicago, on December 23, 1885, Miss Bessie Bradwell, '80, to 
Mr. Frank A. Helmer. 

On January 14, 1886, at Mansfield, La., Miss Alice R, F. Williams to 
Mr. Henry Frank, ex-' 77. 

At Dillon, Montana, on January 14, 1886, Miss Anna Coffin, ex-'87, 
to Rev. Wilder Nutting. 

At New York, on December 1, 1885, Miss Grace Fancher Nicoll to 
Mr. William H. Harris, '78. 

At Ripon, Wis., December 24, 1885, Miss Belle Merrill, ex-'87, to 
Mr. Fred Austin. 

At Billings, M. T., March 28, 1886, Miss Florence A. Smith, Island 
Pond, Vt, to Mr. S. H. Wilson, ex-'88. 

At the residence of the bride's mother, Friday, November 20, by the 
Rev. Ichabod Van Twistum, '86, Elizabeth Ann Punch, '89, to Epaphro- 
ditus Jehosophat Gubtail, 88. At home Wednesdays, in December, 
from 4.30 to 5.30 p. m., on the corner of Pumpkin Avenue and Onion 
Row.* 

*The Groom wore the Editor's best suit, surreptitiously procured for the occasion. — 
[Note by Editor-in-Chief.] 




^EBODVSIUGKINCIOVE, 
PULLDOWN THE BUND 



108 



THE MULE. 

BY A FRESHMAN. 

THE mule is a very kind animul he 
kan kick an' sing an' bra an' eat oats, 
lie has no horns like a kow or an ele- 
fant but he has big ears an' legs an' kan 
kick hardern a rock, i saw a mule kum 
up to a pot of drid appuls on a fire an' 
eat 'em. the appuls waz runnin over an' 
he got lots of 'em all two wunce the mule 
busted kaus the appuls got to swellin an' 
when i kum to i wuz up to my chin in 
apple sos the mule wuz ded. a mule kan 
jump stif legged an' kum down as quick 
as litnin an' you fea] like you wuz chopped 
in too. the mule looks sleepy an' tired 
but he is sharpern a serpents tuth. a 
mule is oviverous or viviverous, i don't no 
which. When you by a mule get a kow 
or a kan of night-ro-glis-reen or a mustard 
plaster, a mustard plaster has no legs 
but it is as strong as deth. 



109 



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litter, blighting, blasting 
Uthlesa hand of cruel fate 
snatch away this noble li 
lull ul Sine for future yea 


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nreeping Pleiades on hlgl 
t loose the flood-gatea of j 
lile aching hearts and tre 
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wary Death receive thy g 
yield him to thee at thj 
gather round the solemn 

d chant his last sad requi 



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110 



\mial of f|^%< 



AN EPIC 



tf 1NG, O Muse, of the death of Viridum Folium Trig O. 
I) Nometry, and the baleful wrath of the sons of Sopho. 
♦ Which of the gods has joined these classes in deadliest conflict, 
While mighty Jo(v)e was opposing their counsels with threatnings of vengeance. 



Leader for years of the Freshies in many a struggle and conflict, 
Faint and discouraged at last with futile and fruitless endeavor 
Any impression to make on the minds of these verdant young Freshmen, 
Leaving his body behind, poor Trig sent his soul down to Orcus. 



Then Eighty- eight did assemble, both Greeks and Barbarians together, 
Maidens and youths, and old men with visages solemn and mournful, 
Funeral pomp to prepare, and, with incense and rites sacrificial, to 
Rescue his Shade from contempt in the dreary regions of Pluto. 



Dazed and distracted with grief, and busy with preparation, 
Never a thought of the enemy troubled their pious young spirits, 
Till, in the guise of Richardson, guardian angel of Lakeshore, 
Mercury, fleet-footed herald divine, announced that their leader, 
Crafty in counsel, and also their organ-mouthed orator, Atreus 
Helio-gab-alus Henry, were snared by the wiles of the Soph'mores, 
Captured and hurried away to a dismal dungeon in Glencoe. 



Then, for the moment dismayed, their plans overwhelmed in confusion, 
Sadly the Freshmen assembled, despair on each visage depicted. 
Then there arose in the council a sage, honey-mouthed like to Nestor, 
Isopus Resurrectaterus Hitt, with winged words speaking, 
And with eyes rolling, cried fiercely, "We'll do it or bust ! " 



There was the council dissolved, while each with new courage inspired, and 
Struggling with deepest emotions, went to the duty assigned to him. 
Crankus Berecyntiades Thwing, from the foe by the giants 
Cleveland and Hansen, protected, raving and tearing his hair and 



111 






Invoking the Pun-ic divinities, brings from the cavernous, soundless 
Depths of his unfathomed brain the eulogy, wild and erratic. 
Meanwhile Editus Charitoblepharous Quereau, the mournful-eyed 
Child of despair, in the depths of his den sits courting Melpomene, 
Whence he emerges at last with his sad and tearful oration. 



What are those strains that I hear, as sad and subdued as the fog-horn ? 

Nearer and nearer they come : 'tis the doleful funeral procession, 

Wending its sorrowful way to th' appointed place of cremation. 

Dark is the night, and heaven weeps in sympathy with them. 

Sadly surrounding the bier they discharge the last mournful duties, 

Poem, oration and eulogy wring from hearts of the mourners 

Tears, lamentations and wailing. Then were the torches of pine wood 

Placed 'neath the pyre, and the flames mounted heavenward with the lugubrious 

Notes of a dirge, composed by that gifted child of Apollo, 

Charles Erucephalas Linebarger, petted and loved of the Muses, 

Sung by himself, with the aid of Caddock, tamer of horses, 

Little, his twin brother, mighty at boxing, and gentle-eyed Calkins. 



Ended the dirge, and the ashes, gathered and heaped in a barrow, 

Silent as death the procession, winding along in the darkness, 

Entered the campus at midnight, and there 'neath an oak-tree they buried 

All that remained that was mortal of Greenleaf Trig, and departed, 

Sad at heart, while the Soph'mores straightway went off on a Tangent, 

Teeming with jokes of Sophomoric and puns on the names of the Freshmen. 



Then on the morrow, as Dawn, rosy-fingered, arose in her beauty, 
Clad in the insignia of woe, the Freshmen came, silently bearing 
Garlands of flowers and leaves to strew on the grave and adorn it. 
One who was skilful at carving inscribed on the trunk of the oak-tree 
Symbols dear to the dead and a name that will live through the ages. 



Fain would I sing of the woe that befell the impious Soph'mores, 
Who, in defiance of law, interfered with the innocent Freshmen ; 
Fain would I tell — but my Muse is scornful of themes so prosaic. 




112 



> y ^ » ^ y» f ^f f 



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ero, 



AN ILL LiIsye^yed po^E. 






STRIPLING youth to college came, 
Intent upon his future fame. 
He bore aloft in colors green, 
A banner upon which was seen 
Excelsior ! 




He hastened to the President, 
To tell his fervid heart's intent : 
I've come to climb the hill of lore, 
And try the Pass ; though small and poor, 
I'll get there, sir ! 

The President his glasses raised, 
And looking on the youth amazed, 
He said : We'll put you in a class 
Of bright, Fresh youths, to try the Pass 
Together, sir. 

But soon the way became quite rough, 
The stripling thought it was quite tough ; 
" So steep, so high this hill," he cried ; 
" How much I wish that I might ride, 
I wish it, sir ! 




He heard the voice of one so kind, 
Of well disposed, fraternal mind : 
" Once I was in just such a boat ; 
I joined a Frat and rode the goat, 
And got there, sir ! " 



113 




Another philanthrophic friend, 
Had otherwise to recommend : 
" ' There is a way where there's a will,' 
A pony takes me up the hill — 
I get there, sir ! " 

Then next was heard a trembling Greek : 
" ' The}- tell us, sir, that we are weak,' 
But when we're worn down poor and thin, 
Our Leader kindly takes us in 
The ambulance." 




The youth was wondering which to ride, 
When lo ! another sight he spied. 
" I see,'' cried he, "a big balloon ; 
What else will take me up so soon 
As it will, sir ? " 

" Then shoot your pony, hang 3-0111* goat, 
Awa}^ with ambulance and boat ; 
Of gas I have a full suppl}-, 
To lift this balloon to the sk} r , 
I'll get there, sir ! " 

" 'Tis but a zero, Freshie dear," 
A veteran said, who stood quite near, 
" It stands for nought ; it tells the tale 
Of all who in this journe3*"/«i7 
To make the Pass" 

A tear stood in his fading eye ; 
He drawled out in a pensive sigh : 
" O blessed nothing ! zero blest ! 
I'm breaking down, I must have rest — 
Collapsior !" 



114 



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Gone, but ]\fot forgotten. 



'86, 



HERE is a class called 

So I hear, 
Much famed for dark and treacherous tricks, 
Far and near. 
Upon its record dark, 
Tis said, a charcoal mark 

Would loom up dazzling white. 
But hush ! speak not so loud ; 
Its deeds let sorrow shroud 
In kind oblivious night. 



A gloomy weight of sadness hangs 

Even now, 
Thick as some straight-haired school girl's bangs, 

O'er its brow. 
Excruciating brief 
The harrowing tale of grief 

To sympathizing souls appears ; 
Indeed, it's so soon told, 
And eke so ancient old, 

There's scarce a chance for tears. 



A few short years ago that class, 

Fancy free, 
Recked not that where they chanced to 

In their glee, 
There fell a greener shade 
On every little blade 

Of fresh and verdant grass. 
Alas ! alack a-day ! 
Time lured two-thirds astray — 

Two-thirds of all the class. 



116 



A*^*^***^*^^^ 



But when the rest, the true and tried, 

Seniors now, 
Came back for one last pony ride, 

Ere their bow, 
Adversity severe 
Had made each doubly dear, 

Of all that little clan. 
And now — dear ! dear ! 
Forgive this scalding tear — 

They mourn their bravest man. 

You see they fooled (like Freshmen raw 

Kound a pony) — 
Fooled round that sharp-toothed buzzing saw, 

Matrimony. 
Ere yet they dreamed of harm, 
Two fell beneath its charm, 

Entranced to hear it sing. 
But one was much too bold — 
Oh ! would the tale were told ! — 

He tried to tame the thins ! 



" Don't monkey with the buzz-saw,' 
Every throat ; 



cried 



Yet swore he that the thing he'd ride, 

Like a goat. 

* * # * * 

Since that sad day, no shred, 
Or hair from off his head 

His classmates e'er have found. 
No wonder gladness dies 
From '86's eyes 

Whene'er his name you sound ! 




117 



BON DIEU ! ! 

ADSPICE PACTA! 

Mirable Visu ! Mirable Dictu ! 

Frigida est dies cum disistimus ! ! 

FOR A FEW DAYS ONLY. 





Si vis pacem, para belluxn. 

Ach! Dunnernund Blitzen! 

We are WEEDEN out our competitors, and having 

received a Fresh Assortment of DRESS COATS, 

are prepared to show at our 

MISFIT PARLORS. 

THE FOLLOWING STYLES: 

The "HE A VY FLUNKER "—A la Brigg-amle, the Masher's own suit. 

The "CORKSCREW SKINNY"— Appropriate for solemn and Grave occasions. 

The " FAT MUG W UMP" — Madame DemoresVs latest in Cottage fashions. 

The "MUSH FADDY""— Corset Cut, suitable for all occasions, but one suit necessary. 

The " CLAP JAW"— 'Tis a beauty— Tis-de-l-atest. 

The " FOGHORN WARBLER "—Waiter's Costume in Beer Gardens. 

The " NOISY ANGLE-TOED "—Good suits for a L{a)yman. 

The -JUMBO ALMIGHTY"— Worn only by the Young. 

The " HA(Y)MILL "—Worn by Clodhoppers. 

The •• CENTRE-COUGH-CUT-AWAY"— Cut away as much as you please. 

The " HELL GATE"— Worn by Bib. Leon d in the First Crusade. 

The " STALE JOKER "—In use by that girl of mine and Her Ben. 

The " FATHER HUBBARD "—The latest style of Overcoat for Alumni, used by Gods of War. 

We have many other styles too nobby and fantastic to mention. Our competitors, driven 
to the Waughl, are palming off last summer's goods for Fresh styles. Holdon ! See us Wright 
away, or you may have cause to Howell. 

Special rates to Clubs. Bibs and Dudes, 25 per cent. off. 



COME ONE! COME ALL! 



, 118 

< 

( . 



-$& 0^I3° n *D' eu -^ 



&- 



jforeknow by this the tenor of my song : 
Review I shall a tale that's somewhat long ; 
<£xact I'll tell how youth and beauty vied, 
§o have no fear that any are belied. 
JJowever, that the fruits foretell the tree, 
Jfcjark, well ! the time was eighty-five, B. C, 
<£t place, to shores of cooling lake was near 
Jjfow read with care, but be not too severe. 



Should you ask me whence these stories, 
Whence the legends, and traditions, 
Which they call the jokes of college, 
With the dew and damp of ages, 
With their frequent repetitions, 
With their wild reverberations, 
As of thunder in the mountains, 
I should answer, I should tell you, 
From the eastward and the westward, 
From the great schools of our fathers, 
From the land of grand old Oxford, 
From the land of our own Harvard, 
From the many courts of learning 
Where the great men of the future 
Now are laying their foundations. 

I narrate one as I saw it 
In the moonlight of November. 
I narrate it, I repeat it 
For the good of those not knowing 
The excitement, the enjoyment, 
The chagrin, or satisfaction 
Of a good old "college squabble." 

As the Bible wisely sayeth 
That of wars there shall be rumors, 
That of wars there shall be many ; 
So the year of this our story 
Well fulfilled the prophet's saying. 
Many times the tribe of Pewnees 
Had in battle met the Moguls, 
Had by Moguls been defeated, 
Had by all been much derided. 
Had been jeered, and scoffed, and scouted 
So that as the time drew nearer 
For the Moguls' yearly war-dance, 



It was plain to all observers 

That there was to be a something 

Perpetrated by the Pewnees, 

That should make victorious Moguls 

Evermore to be as exiles 

Shunned and spurned by all the nations. 

The Pewnees' Council. 

In a rage and in a passion 
Heavy Flunker a briggande, 
He, the chief of Pewnees, chafing 
Like the steed for battle waiting, 
Sendeth forth a proclamation, 
Calling all his men together, — 
Calls his warriors to his council. 
Down the alleys and the by-ways 
Come the warriors to his wigwam- 
Corkscrew Skinny, Mush McFaddy, 
Fat Mug (wump) and Clap- Jaw Tizzie, 
Ha(y)mill, Hell Gate, Foghorn Warbler, 
Jumbo, Leo. Father Hubbard. 

Now they gather in a circle 
With their weapons and their war gear, 
Painted like the grass of springtime, 
Painted like the robe of summer, 
Wildly glaring at each other. 

In their faces bold defiance, 
In their hearts the pangs of vanquished 
And hereditary hatred. 
Heavy Flunker a briggande 
Looked upon them in his passion, 
Looked upon their wrath and wrangling 
Then with haughty mien and manner 



119 



Spoke to them with voice majestic, 
As the sound of far-off donkeys 
Braying on a frosty morning: 
" Corkscrew Skinny, hear my message. 
Brave of braves, on you it resteth 
To retrieve our fallen fortunes. 
To restore our name for valor. 
To outwit the tricky Moguls. 
Now. to you I give the mission, 
Give the planning, give the scheming, 
Give to you the use of money. 
Every brave of our great nation 
At your nod, shall do your bidding ; 
This my order, now perform it 
Yon shall be forever honored." 
Corkscrew Skinny, for a moment, 
Bowed his head in meditation ; 
Then with look of exultation, 
As of one who, in a vision, 
Sees what is to be, but is not. 
Brew an arrow from his quiver, 
Shoots it high into the heavens ; 
Then, as it began descending. 
Sternly said, with deep emotion :— 
" What goes upward must come downward. 
Moguls shall be no exception. 
On this evening feast the Moguls 
At the home of Calkinsensis, 
On this night shall fall disaster 
On the heads of his pale brothers. 
If not so, I hope the morrow 
Finds me with the happy hunters. 
This shall be our plan of action, 
Listen, each one to his portion. 
Clap-Jaw Tizzie, you have access 
To the house where feast the Moguls ; 
So, before the evening falleth, 
Take this youngster and secrete him 
In the attic 'mong the rubbish ; 
Bid him wait there until nightfall, 
Till he hears the noise of dancing, 
Till the Moguls all are merry- 
Lost in revelry and music. 
When their chiefs are captivated 
By the glance of dusky maidens, 
When the song and dance rage highest, 
When the music falls and riseth, 
Bid him gently leave his covert, 
Softly steal down to the chamber 
Where the braves have left their wrappings, 
Left their gowns, and robes, and weapons ; 
Take them all up to the garret, 
And from thence upon the house-top, 
Make them fast in goodly bundle, 
Let them from the roof come downward. 
In the meanwhile other warriors 
Will procure a sledge and mustang, 
And be waiting down below you 
To assist you in your effort, 
To convey you and your treasure 
Far from harm and far from danger. 
Thus by bold and fearless action 



We'll retrieve our fallen fortunes, 
We'll heap vengeance on the Moguls, 
By compelling them to wander 
Through the streets and in mid-winter, 
Barehead, robeless, with their sweethearts, 
Barehead, robeless, to the Fern. Sem. 
In the weeks and months that follow 
Every class that's in the college 
Shall upbraid them, shall torment them. 
Shall deride them as insipid ; 
They shall be of song the subject 
In the Annual of our college." 

Thus spoke Corkscrew, with excitement, 
And a war cry rent the heavens, 
Every warrior to his feet sprang, 
Sped away to do his bidding. 

TWoguls* W)ar Ranee. 

Bright the moon rose o'er the waters, 

Shedding rich effulgent shadows, 

Burst in all its silent splendor 

On a band of happy Moguls, 

Wending to their yearly war dance, 

Filled with merriment and jesting, 

Filled with song, and filled with laughter, 

Clad in all their richest raiment, 

Robes of fur, and caps of sealskin, 

Splendid with their streaming feathers, 

Beautiful with beads and tassels. 

At the doorway stood their chieftain, 

Waiting kindly, to receive them. 

In his eye a secret twinkle, 

In his grasp a knowing pressure. 

Gladly welcomed he his people, 

Bade them enter and be merry ; 

In they went unto a chamber, 

Left their wraps, applied their war paint, 

And appeared in dancing costumes, 

In the gayly lighted parlors. 

But their chieftain with a gesture 
Motioned silence to his people, 
Called upon his braves to meet him 
Instantly in private council. 
Ten, the bravest of the warriors, 
Followed, wondering, while he led them 
Up the stairs into the attic. 
Now, imagine their amazement 
When they saw, right there before them, 
Tied and bound unto a bedstead, 
Black with rage, a puny Pewnee. 
Then he told how he had found him. 
Dressed appropriate for service, 
Hid away behind the boxes 
Lying flat upon his stomach. 
" Now, my braves, be quick ; decide you 
W T ho's this Pewnee ? What's his purpose ? 
Is he sent here by his people ? 
What shall be our plan of action ? " 
Then with minds well called prophetic, 
Quickly they divined his purpose 
Was to rob them them of their wrappings. 



120 



.A^A^A^A^A^A^A, 



Since a rope was on his person 

It was easy to determine 

Plot, and plan of execution. 

So the Moguls, quick at scheming, 

Soon decided in their council, 

To reverse the joke intended, 

To instruct the guileless Pewnees 

Not to " monkey with the buzz-saw, 1 ' 

Not to " pull the tiger's tail." 

Out of quilts was made a bundle 

Looking some like robes and mufflers, 

And about the time that Bacchus 

Should have all intoxicated, 

One short Mogul, dressed precisely 

As the Pewnee that was captured, 

Took upon his arm the bundle, 

And appeared upon the house-top 

In the frosty liquid moonlight. 

Just below them, in the basement, 

Stood ten strong and stalwart warriors 

Waiting, watching, at a doorway. 

One low whistle from the house-top 

Brought to view, as if by magic, 

Myriad warriors grim and silent, 

Dressed like goblins in a legend. 

Here and there they darted swiftly. 

No one spoke a single sentence, 

All gazed upwards hushed in silence. 

Verily, the moon above them, 

Must have halted in her orbit 

Wondering at the scene beneath her,— 

Wondering at the spectral warriors, 

Which her beams but made more ghost-like. 

Slowly o'er the roof descended 
In the shadow of the building, 
Large and long a goodly bundle. 
One could see a slight commotion, 
Every warrior pressing forward, 
Reaches high above his fellows, 
To be first to seize the booty. 
Near, and yet so far's a saying, 
Never yet was better proven ; 
For as thunder in the heavens 
Belches forth, most quick and sudden, 
Or as panthers in their preying 
Spring on their unconscious victims, 
So from out the basement doorway 
Sprang the watching, waiting Moguls, — 
Sprang on those unconscious Pewnees. 
Four they seized and chased the others 
'Cross the lawns, and round the houses, 
Down the alleys, over hedges. 
Some for refuge fled to maidens, 
Tied themselves to strings of aprons, 
Tied themselves, and when demanded, 
Whining said, '* I didn't mean to." 
'Mong the others, there was taken 
What to many was a wonder : 
Dude of dudes— and guns ! the collar 
Was enough to make a goblin 
Out of Afric's darkest heathen. 
When he spoke he made a rumble 



Like the hollow depths of Hades. 
Then another there was captured, 
Of whose name and reputation 
Very little shall be written. 
Like unto a dog he acted, 
Snarling, snapping, growling, biting, 
But 'twas said he must be pardoned 
Since " papoose " was his cognomen. 
Verily, it were a pity 
Such an one had not. died early. 
Clap-Jaw showed his mighty valor, 
By imploring squaw protection. 
But of all the prisoners taken 
In respect unto good breeding 
Mush McFaddy bore the palm leaf. 
At a late hour in the evening, 
All the captured ones were taken, 
Showed unto the kindly hostess, 
Gently led out to the doorstep, 
Sent away to meet their brothers, 
'Mid the war cry of the Moguls. 
As the grass is in the morning 
Green and fresh with dewy showers, 
But cut down, at noon it withers, 
Fades away and loses sweetness, 
So the scheme of Corkscrew Skinny, 
Which at first so much had promised 
To the oft-defeated Pewnees, 
Fell before the Moguls' sickle- 
Fell to rise no more forever. 

Resultat. 

Full of wrath was Sitting Bullock 

When he woke up in the night time. 

Found the people in confusion, 

Heard of all the misdemeanors, 

All the malice and the mischief, 

Of the cunning, tricky Moguls. 

Hard his breath came through his nostrils, 

Through his teeth he hissed and muttered 

Words of anger and resentment, 

Hot and burning, like a hornet. 

"I will squelch these Moguls,— 

Squelch these mischief-makers ! " said he 
"Not so long and wide the world is, 
Not so rude and rough the world is, 
That my wrath shall not attain them, 
That my vengeance shall not reach them ! ' 
Then, again, old Sitting Bullock 
Rolled and tumbled on his blanker- 
Rolled and waited for the morrow, 
When he should present his grievance 
To his colleagues in a council. 
Big-e-Man-i-Joe the mighty, 
When he heard the dreadful stories. 
Summoned to appear before him, 
Both the Moguls, and the Pewnees. 
Looked upon them with compassion, 
With paternal love and pity ; 
Over them he stretched his right hand 
To subdue their stubborn natures, 



121 



W^WT WTWT' 



W* W* W»' 



■^ w mw* 



i^A^A^A^AIi 



To allay their thirst for vengeance, 
By the shadow of his right hand ; 
Spoke to them with accents earnest, 
Warning, chiding,— spoke in this wise : 
" O, my children ! my poor children ! 
Listen to the words of wisdom,— 
Listen to the words of warning. 
We have giv'n you 'Gym' to box in, 
Giv'n you 'Tugs of War ' and Base-hall, 
Giv'n you long beaux, giv'n you cross beaux, 
Take your choice in ' Brick 1 or ' Cottage.' 
Giv'n you of the best of knowledge, 
Why, then, are you not contented ? 



Why, then, will you fight each other ? 

We are weary of your quarrels, 

Of your wranglings and dissensions ; 

And since Sitting Bullock worries 

And declares it his purpose 

To deprive us of the pleasure 

Of his papoose in the college, 

If we do not take some action 

To subdue these awful wranglings. 

Therefore, know ye, here henceforward, 

We, the sachems, have in council. 

Like a boulder on a pumpkin, 

Set ourselves upon your socials.'" 



Note.— To make this poem compatible with the events upon which it is founded, it has been 
necessary in several instances to use phrases and to introduce scenery not in strict harmony 
with my plot. 

I desire to take this opportunity to thank my friend, Henry W. Longfellow, for many valua- 
ble suggestions and much useful information. 

The Author. 




Chorus of citizens. 



" What have Ave here' 
A carpet sale? " 



122 



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ene^at 



ftti»aft^ 



1886. 

June 24. Thursday.— Commencement. 

Sept. 14. Tuesday.— Examinations for admission. 

Sept. 15. Wednesday.— First term begins. 

Sept. 21. Tuesday. — Year begins in the College of Medicine. 

Sept. 22. Wednesday. — Year begins in the College of Law. 

Sept. 22. Wednesday. — First Term begins in the Conservatory of Music. 

Dec. 15. Wednesday. — Term Examinations begin. 

Dec. 17. Friday. — Contest for the Norton Prizes in Declamation. 

Dec. 22. Wednesday. — First Term ends. 

1887. 

Jan. 5. Wednesday. — Second Term begins. 

Jan. 6. Thursday. — Seniors present Essays for Deering Prizes. 

Jan. 27. Thursday.— Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Mar. 22. Tuesday. — Anniversary of the College of Medicine. 

Mar. 23. Wednesday. — Term Examinations begin. 

Mar. 30. Wednesday. — Second Term ends. 

April 6. Wednesday. — Third Term begins. 

April 8. Friday. — Contest for Gage Prizes in Debate. 

June 6. Monday. — Senior Examinations begin. 

June 16. Thursday. — Anniversary of the College of Law. 

June 17. Friday. — Contest for the Kirk Prize in Oratory. 

June 19. Sunday. — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 20. Monday. — Examinations for admission. 

June 20. Monday. — Class Day. 

June 20. Monday. — Anniversary of the Preparatory School. 

June 21. Tuesday. — Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

June 21. Tuesday. — Conservatory Concert. 

June 22. Wednesday. — Business Meeting and Anniversary of Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

June 23. Thursday.— Commencement. 

Sept. 13. Tuesday. — Examinations for admission. 

Sept. 14. Wednesday. — First Term begins. 



c~~ 



123 



>mw^w ^ 



v ^ v mv^v^v^mmwmv* 



^&n&^al Qalenda^t 



1885. 

Sept. 16. College Term begins. 

Sept. 25. Sun rose at 5.50. 

Oct. 2. AT reunion at Miss Crandon's. 

Oct. 5. Eugensia mortua est ! 

Oct. 13. KKT jubilee. 

Oct. 24. Sun rose at 6.28. 

Oct. 30. Beta jubilee at Calkins'. 

Nov. 1. Sun set at 4.54. 

Nov. 13. KKT chocolataire. 

Nov. 17. Perley gets mad at Lakin. 

Nov. 20. Hinman open session. 

Nov. 20. Sophs steal the Freshmen clothing. 

Nov. 21. "OBonDieu!" 

Nov. 21. Freshmen steal the Soph's clothing. 8 p. m., Hemenway discovered. 

Freshmen captured and bound. 

Nov. 24. Preps faculty send tutor Tisdel his resignation. Too much class row. 

Nov. 26. Thanksgiving. — Turkey goes down. 

Nov. 27. Sick students. — Turkey comes up ! 

Nov. 28. Perley said "Hello !" to Lakin. 

Dec. 1. Fleming pulls the green cord. 

Dec. 5. Sun rises at 7.14. 

Dec. 10. A # reception to Miss J. M. Bancroft. 

1886. 

Jan. 1. New Year. 

Jan. 6. Second term begins. 

Jan. 7. Five Seniors present essays for Deering prizes. Only five prizes. 

Jan. 15. Five Seniors gain prizes ! 

Jan. 20. Baxter pulls the green cord. 

Jan. 24. Sig goat lame. Carried double. 

Jan. 25. Baxter pulls the green cord again. 

Jan. 29. Hamill receives his second notice to pay his term bill. College in 

financial peril. 

Feb. 1. Hamill paid his term dues. College firm again. 

Feb. 2. Baxter and Fleming both pull the green cord. 

Feb. 5. Tau Beta Gamma founded. Beta chapter. 

Feb. 5. Prof. Pearsons entertains the Senior class. 

Feb. 7. Oysters at Holden Club ! ! 

Feb. 10. Dr. Marcy winks at the logic class. Sun sets two minutes early in 

consequence. 

Feb. 12. Baxter pulls the green cord. 

Feb. 13. Algebra gets away with the Freshmen. 

Feb. 15. Springer introduces resolutions by which the government may be 

saved. 

Feb. 16. Prof. Kellogg laid out by Freshman chirography. 

Feb. 20. Perley and Lakin O. K. 

Feb. 22. University day. 12 p. m. to 1 a. m. Midnight dissipation and 

Bacchanalian revels by the Bibs ! (See cut p. 61). 

Feb. 24. Baxter pulls the green cord. 

Mar. 8. Science Hall a settled fact. Torchlights and horns. 

Mar. 25. Baxter pulls the red cord. 

Mar. 26. Pan-Hellenic movement inaugurated. 

Mar. 31. Second term ends. 

April 1. The fool ! 

April 7. Third term begins. 

April 8. Mirabile visu ! Juniors bloom in white plugs. 

April 9. Junior-Sophomore debate contest. 

April 12. Prep Faculty on the verge of ruin ! Tisdel reappointed tutor. 

Facult} r saved ! 

April 14. Asinine majority defeat the Pan-Hellenic movement. 

April 15. Baxter pulls the green cord. 

124 



P\hTfihi i\$$ociation 



Qfficers. 

President, .... HENRY A. PEARSONS, '62. 
Vice-President, . . . MARIE HUSE WILDER, '68. 

Secretary and Treasurer, . . FRANK E. LORD, '83. 

G^cecutiue Committee. 

Henry A. Pearsons, '62. Frank E. Lord, '83. 

Marie Huse Wilder, '68. Martin M. Gridley, '83. 

Merritt C. Bragdon, '70. 

I^oard of directors. 

Term of Office Expires 1886. 

Merritt C. Bragdon, 70. Henry A. Pearsons, '62. 

Frank M. Bristol, 77. 

Term of Office Expires 1887. 

James H. Raymond, '71. J. Frank Stout, 75. 

Frank E. Lord, '83. 

Term of Office Expires 1888. 

Marie Huse Wilder, '68. Martin M. Gridley, '83. 

E. Wyllys Andrews, 78. 

historian. 

Term of Office Expires 1886. 
Elizabeth R. Hunt, 77. 



Membership, ....... 232 

Endowment Fund, ...... $2,460.00 

Total Assets of Association, .... $2,712.62 



125 



J^lumni, 



Compiled by D. H. BLOOM, '85, and C. J±. WIGHTMAN, '85. 



( 



1858. 

*f Lydia M. Waugh, nee Hayes. 

1859. 
M.D., Holland 



Thomas E. Annis, A.M 
City, Mich. 

Winchester E. Clifford, A.M., Insurance, 
Evanston, 111. 

Samuel L. Eastman, A.M., Newbury, Vt. 

Henry M. Kidder, Ph. B., £ A &, Busi- 
ness, N. Evanston, 111. 

1860 



Elhanon J. Searle, A. M., Lawyer, St. 

Louis, Mo. 
f Margaret McKee, Batavia, 111. 
f Frances E. Willard, A <P, Evanston, 

111. 



*Alphonso C. Linn, A.B., died in army, 
(1864.) 

William A. Lord, A. B., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Homer A. Plimpton, A.B., Mining, Den- 
ver, Col. 

Wm. H. H. Rawleigh, Ph.B., <2> A &, 
Business, Baltimore, Md. 

* Elmore Q. Searle, A.B. 

Melville C. Spaulding, A.B., Real Estate, 
348 Washington Boul., Chicago, 111. 

Frank A. Springer, A.B., Teacher, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

*Hart L. Stewart, A.B. 

1861 



f Elizabeth D. Benthall, nee Wilson, Quas- 
queton, Iowa. 

f Julia Jones, nee Wood, Howells, Dak. 

f Julia Miller, nee Atkins, Sheffield, Mass. 

*|Ada Marshall, nee Ward. 

fM. Louisa Medlar, nee Dake, Wood- 
stock, 111. 

f Martha J. Smith, nee Stewart, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

fMary H. Willard, nee Bannister, Editor 
The Signal, Evanston, 111. 

*|Mary E. Willard. 



James W. Haney, A.M., Rev., Blandins- 

ville, 111. 
Martin Mohler, A.B., Teacher, Downs, 

Kas. 
William A. Spencer, A.B., D.D., Rev., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

* Warren Taplin, A.B. 
*JohnC. Wilson, Ph. B. 

* f Celia E. Boyd, nee Stow, 
f Louisa M. Fitch, nee Bragdon, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

1862. 



f Lydia M. Howe, Teacher, 215 S. Peoria 
St., Chicago, 111. 

f Margaret J. Kinney, nee Shannon, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

f Mary L. Ludlam, Evanston, 111. 

f Isabella S. Foote, nee Miner, Pasadena, 
Cal. 

f Mary E. Shepherd, nee Bragdon, Evans- 
ton, 111. 



Robert Bentley, A.B., Rev., Alameda, Cal. 
Bennett B. Botsford, Ph.B., Salesman, 

95 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Isaac W. McCaskey, A.M., Gov. Service, 

27 Gov. Building, Chicago, 111. 
* Henry G. Meacham, A.B., died in army, 

(1863.) 
Henry A. Pearsons, A.M., 'E X, Real 

Est., 92 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
William F. Rose, A.M., Rev., Pecatonica, 

111. 

1863. 



A.M., Lawyer, Pitts- 



David Sterrett, 
burgh, Pa. 

Harriet C. Furber, nee Wood, Chicago, 111. 

Mary E. Harding, nee Clifford, Goshen, 
Ind. 

Emily M. Jones, nee Hall, Lincoln, 111. 

Georgia A. Muller, nee Bryce, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Cornelia F. Emmett, nee Winslow, Sib- 
ley, Iowa. 



Henry M. Bannister, A.M., M.D., Kan- 
kakee, 111. 

Almus Butterfield, A.B., Com. Mer., 182 
So. Water St., Chicago, 111. 

f Frances A. Bentley, nee Harvey, Ala- 
meda, Cal. 

f Harriet A. Fisher, nee De Coudres, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



f Aurelia M. Ferry, Michigan City, Ind. 

f Cornelia S. Ferry, Michigan City, Ind. 

f Louise Huntoon, nee Gamble, Laporte, 
Ind. 

f Jennie M. Pearce, nee Wheeler, Balti- 
more, Md. 

f Mary E. Stephens, nee Bishop, Winona, 
Minn. 



126 



_J 



1864. 



Frederick J. Hutchings, Ph.B., Farmer, 
Northfield, 111. 

Milton C. Springer, A.M., # K W, Busi- 
ness, Wilmette, 111. 

Geo. E. Strobridge, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
$ KW, New York. 



f Cornelia A. 

Waukegan, 
f Clancine R. 

Orange, N. 
•f Belle Wallace 
f Sarah E. Wright, 

ford, N. Y. 



Holyoke, nee Wheeler, 

111. 

Mann, nee Borchsenius, 

J- 

nee Denning, Paris, 111. 
Holmes, West- 



1865. 



Chas. C. Bragdon, A.M., $ K W, Princi 
pal Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, 
Mass. 

* Melvin A. Pingree, A.B., # KW(iS66.) 

Elbert B. Wheeler, Ph.B., <2> K W, 
Farmer, Arlington Heights, 111. 

f Emilie G. Bishop, Oregon, Wis. 



f Josephine Hill, nee Day, Ishpheming, 

Mich, 
f A. Vernette Snyder, nee Forbes, Sabula 

Bluffs, Iowa, 
f Mary E. Springer, nee Ward, Wilmette, 

111. 
f Martha W. Wilson, nee Richardson, 

Abingdon, 111. 



1 



1866. 



James Frank, A.M., $ K W, Lawyer, 86 
La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Liston H. Pearce, A.M., Rev., Baltimore, 
Md. 

Joseph C. Thomas, A.B., Rev., New York. 

Arthur J. Wheeler, A.M., Rev., Byron 
Centre, Mich. 

f Alice S. Comstock, Evanston, 111. 

f Ellen E. Garnsey, nee Bradley, Wil- 
mette, 111. 



f Amelia Holcomb, Libertyville, 111. 

f Mary E. Lott, nee White, Sycamore, 111. 

f Emma J. Phelps, nee Kyle, Rogers Park, 
111. 

f Ella C. Palmer, nee Judson, South Bend, 
Ind. 

f Mary E. Sewell, nee Wright, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 



1867. 



John W. Bissell, A.M., D.D., Rev., Pres. 
of U. I. University, Fayette, Iowa. 

J. Howard Brooks, A.B., Rev., Saint 
Paul, Neb. 

William C. Comstock, A.B., <£ K W, 
Commission Business, Evanston, 111. 

Morton Culver, A.M., # K W, Lawyer, 
153 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

John Ellis, A.M., Rev., $ K W, Mt. Car- 
roll, 111. 

John B. McGuffin, A.M., Rev., £ K W, 
Turner Junction, 111. 



Thos. R. Strobridge, A.M., Rev., $ KW, 
Aurora, 111. 

Geo. W. Winslow, A.M., Rev., Frank- 
fort, 111. 

} Frances J. Bright, nee Roberts, Wau- 
paca, Wis. 

* f Mary Ann Fisher, nee McKean. 

f Lucy I. Mappin, nee Pearsons, Elgin, 111. 

f Margaret J. Miller, nee McKean, Rock 
Falls, 111. 

f Harriet P. North, nee Linn, Chicago, 111. 

*f Ada S. Kinsman, nee Wanless. 



1868. 



Edmund W. Burke, A.M., # K W, Law- 
yer, 162 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Frederick J. Huse, A. M. , M. D. , Piano, 111. 
William C. Knapp, A.M., Abingdon, 111. 
f Annis A. Gage, Dowagiac, Mich, 
f Nellie L. Henry, nee Case, Rockton, 111. 
*f Fannie C. Larkin. 



f Annie M. Loiseaux, nee Roberts, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

f Alia M. Raymond, nee Beveridge, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

f Elizabeth Torrence, nee Norton, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

f Lucy M. Wilder, «<?^Huse, Evanston, 111. 



1869. 



Jacob R. Allen, A.M., Rev., Oak Hill, Ga. 

Robert Baird, A.M., £ KW, Prof. North- 
western University, Evanston, 111. 

Charles K. Bannister, A.M., <£ K W, 
Business, So. Evanston, 111. 

Andrew B. Bishop, A.M., M.D., £ K W, 
San Jose, Cal. 

Willis Butterfield, A.M., M.D., £ K W, 
Belvidere, 111. 



Hiram Curtiss, A.M., Rev., Sutton, Neb. 
* Albert C. Kennicott, Ph.B., $ K W. 
Wm. M. Raymond, A.M., $ K W, Gov. 

Serv., 216 Cass St., Chicago, 111. 
Chas. G. Root, Ph.B., $ K W, Business 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Henry T. Scovill, A.M., Rev., <£ K W, 

Chicago, 111. 
f Fannie J. Best, nee Stout, Quincy, 111. 



127 






1870. 



Wm. H. H. Adams, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
$ K W, Pies. 111. Wes. University, 
Bloomington, 111. 

Wm. D. Best, A.M., Rev., Champaign, 111. 

Rollin P. Blanchard, Ph.B., Lawyer, 80 
Adams' Ex. Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Merritt C. Bragdon, A.M., M.D., 2 X, 
Evanston, 111. 

Thomas Craven, A.M., Missionary, Luck- 
now, India. 

Michael Finity, A.M. 

Joseph H. Gill, A.M., Missionary, India. 

Ira B. Henry, A.M., Rev., , 111. 

Albert L. Langworthy, A.B., 2 X, 
Deputy, Chicago, 111. 

Amos W. Patten, A.M., Rev., Engle- 
wood, 111. 

Wm. Plestead, A.M., Business, Trinidad, 
Col. 

Homer Potwin, A.B., Business, 126 Wash- 
ington St., Chicago, 111. 



Levi Van Fossen, Ph.B. 

Frederick C. Winslow, Ph.B., M. D., 

2 X, Jacksonville, 111. 
+ Emeline Badger, nee Green, Sterling, 111. 
f Ellen L. Davis, Jacksonville, Cal. 
f Anna L. Davis, nee Marcy, Evanston, 

111. 
f Alice M. Galloway, Fond du Lac, Wis. 
f Fannie Gradle, nee Searles, Chicago, 111. 
* \ Frances Green. 

f Ella E. Hussey, nee Badger, Sterling, 111. 
f Florence L. Knapp, nee Galloway, Fond 

du Lac, Wis. 
f Ella Merwin, nee Bannister, Evanston, 

111. 
f Eliza Powell, nee Thompson, Delaware, 

Ohio, 
f Elizabeth R. Sullivan, nee White, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
I Lily R. Webster, nee Winne, Evanston, 

111. 



1871, 



Daniel O. Fox, A.M., Missionary, India. 

* Edwin D. Gould, A.B. 

Sanford H. Mclntyre, A.M., Teacher, 

Negaunee, Mich. 
Amos H. Miller, A.M., Rev., Morrison, 111. 
AlbertB. Norton, A.B. , Missionary, India. 
Charles W. Pearson, A.M., $ K W, Prof. 

Northwestern Univ., Evanston, 111. 
Arthur W. Penney, Ph.B., Business, 161 

La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
James H. Raymond, A.M., Lawyer, 

Honore Block, Chicago, 111. 
Ozro Rovs, A.M., Rev., Lewiston, Me. 
Richard D. Russell, Rev., Galva, 111. 
Edwin R. Shrader, A.M., Teacher, 

Quincy, 111. 



Herbert W. Woodruff, A.M., Rev. 

Hamilton S. Wicks, Ph.B., 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Kansas City, Mo. 

Levi S. Wilcox, Ph.B.. M.D., Lacon, 
111. 

Geo. L. Yaple, A.M., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Mendon, Mich. 

f Amelia J. Foster, nee Conwell, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

f Josephine C. Gibbs, So. Evanston, 111. 

f Cora H. Merrell, Evanston, 111. 

f Alice A. Wilcox, nee Yaple, Champaign, 
111. 

f Mary E. Yaple, nee Hankinson, Men- 
don, Mich. 



1872. 



Ellery H. Beal, A.M., Rev., 2 X, Platte- 
ville, 111. 

* Thomas S. Berry, A.M. (former Presi- 
dent Simpson College.) 

George E. Bragdon, Ph.B., 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Pueblo, Col. 

James E. Burke, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Aberdeen, D. T. 

Curtis H. Castle, A.B., Lawyer, Knox- 
ville, 111. 

Lorin C. Collins, A.B., 2 X, Judge Cir. 
Court, Cook Co., Norwood Park, 111. 

Lewis P. Davis, A.M., Rev., Alpena, 
Mich. 

Robert B. Edwards, A.B., Lawyer, Lin 
coin, 111. 

Eltinge Elmore, Ph.B., 2 X, Business, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Edwin J. Harrison, Ph.B., 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Sauk Center, Minn. 

John M. Johnson, A.B., Rev. 

Mather D. Kimball, A.B., Business, 
Evanston, 111. 

George Lunt, Ph.B., 2 X, Com. Mer., 
102 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 



Hiram H. Palmer, A.B., Business, Jack- 
sonville, 111. 

Clarence R. Paul, A.B., 2 X, Journalist, 
Washington, D. C. 

Wilbur O. Peet, A.M., Rev., Pike, N. Y. 

Fred. D. Raymond, A.B., 2 X, Auditor 
Union Steel Co., Portland Blk., Chi- 
cago, ill. 

James F. Robinson, A.M., 2 X, Banker, 
Rock Island, 111. 

Fernando Roys, A.B., M.D. 

Amos L. Smith, A.B., Lawyer, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

Herbert M. Thiers, C.E., Lawyer, Keno- 
sha, Wis. 

Edmund B. Woodson, A.B., Business, 
Chicago, 111. 

• Roxie Haney, nee Doe, Lansing, Iowa. 
Livonia Hills, Rockford, 111. 

•• Ella L. Horton, La Crosse, Wis. 

•• Martha C. Huntoon, Evanston, 111. 
Mary L. Martin, Waukegan, 111. 
Anna C. Cumnock, nee Webster, Evans- 
ton, 111. 



128 



1873. 



A.B., Rev., QKW, 
A.B., Business, Mo- 
Ph.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Ph.B., $ K 2, So. 



Edwin C. Arnold, 

Waukegan, 111 
Lewis Butterfield, 

mence, 111. 
Henry A. Cooper, 

Racine, Wis. 
F. W. Cleveland, 

Evanston, 111. 
John M. Dandy, A.B., $ K 2, Journal- 
ist, 89 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 
Byron H. Eldridge, C.E., Locating Eng. 

Mexico Cen. R. R., Chihuahua, Mex. 
Chauncey Gaines, A.M., Business, San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Henry Green, A.B., Lawyer, Sterling, 111. 



Fred. M. Husted, A.M., £ K W, Law- 
yer, San Francisco, Cal. 

William King, A.B., Evanston, 111. 

Draper A. Lindsay, A.B., Lawyer, Fargo, 
D. T. 

*John R. Leslie, Ph.B. 

Wm. J. Minium, A.B., Rev., Atkinson, 111. 

Adolphus H. Needham, A.B., Rev., # K 
W, Healdsburg, Cal. 

Edward L. Parks, A.M., Rev., $ K W, 
Pies. Simpson Col., Indianola, Iowa. 

Lee J. Pitner, A.B., Real Estate, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

\ Emma V. Bannister, nee White, So. 
Evanston, 111. 



1874. 



* Frank M. Beatty, A.B., K2. 

Henry S. Boutell, A.M., LL.B., B & 77, 
Lawyer, 1st Nat.Bk.Bldg,Chicago,Ill. 

Alex. D. Brainard, A.B., Lawyer, Blair, 
Neb. 

David W. Casseday, C.E., # K 2, Real 
Estate, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Chester T. Drake, C.E., 2 X, Machinist, 
160 So. Clinton St., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. C. Estes, C.E., £ K 2, Bay View, 
Wis. 

Oscar L. Gibbs, C.E., Business, So. 
Evanston, 111. 

Joseph M. Hawkes, A.B., B & II, Busi- 
ness, St. Paul, Minn. 

Richard G. Hobbs, A.M., Rev., B © II, 
Springfield, 111. 

Deforest M. Hyde, C.E., $ K 2, Lum- 
ber, Appleton, Wis. 

Matthias S. Kaufman, A.M., Rev., Fall 
River, Mass. 

Wm. M. Knox, A.M., 2 X, Journalist, 
Daily A T ews, Chicago, 111. 

Chas.Leach, Ph.B., Rev., Santa Maria, Cal. 

Oliphant Lewis, A.B., Lawyer, 99 Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago, 111. 



Eli McClish, A.M., Rev., Prin. Grand 
Prairie Sem., Onarga, 111. 

Wm. L. McGarry, Ph.B., Lawyer, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Wm. L. Martin, A.B., $ K 2, Business, 
Kankakee, 111. 

Wm.Omelvena,A.B.,Rev., Rockville,Ind. 

John W. Richards, A.M., Rev., 137 So. 
California Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Daniel C. Riehl, A.M., Rev., 2 X, Ed- 
more, Mich. 

Wm. B. Robinson, A.M., Rev., Omro,Wis. 

Andrew J. Scott,A.M.,Rev., Evanston, 111. 

John W. Scott, A.M., M.D.,Winnetka, 111. 



Gilbert M. Si 



immons, 



Sc.B., 4> K 2. 



Business, Kenosha, Wis. 
George H.Smith, A.M., Rev., Deposit, N.Y 
James Trewartha, A.B., Rev., Wessing- 

ton Springs, D. T. 
Oscar W. Willitts, A.M., Rev., Detroit, 

Mich. 
Melville C. Wire, A.B., Rev., Salem, Ore. 
Thomas J. Ziegler, A.M., Rev., B S 77, 

Dayton, Ohio. 
Rebecca Childs, nee Roland, Ph.B., 

Evanston, 111. 



1875. 



Geo. A. Babbitt, A.B., Reporter, 618 W. 

Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
Joseph H. Bates, A.B., M.D., £ K 2, 

Neponset, 111. 
* Charles H. Burke, A.M. 
Lucius C. Colman, A.B., <P K 2, Lum- 
ber, La Crosse, Wis. 
John J. Crist, A.B., Rev., B O 77, 

Winona, Wis. 
John W. Dickson, A.B., $ K 2, Coal 

Dealer, 2826 So. Park Ave., Chicago. 
Chas. A. Gaskell, A.M., Publisher, 1024 

W. Adams St., Chicago, 111. 
Albert D. Gillespie, Sc.B., Draughtsman, 

5 Lake Park PI., Chicago, 111. 
Cortez J. Goodenow, Sc.B., B S II, 

Business, Granite Falls, Minn. 
John H. Hamline, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 

Portland Block, Chicago, 111. 
Frank A. Hills, A.B., Farmer, Oregon, 111. 



Frank M. Harris, C.E., 2 X, Business, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

James L. Harrison, A.B., Rev., Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

Robert B. Hostetler, Sc.B., $ K 2. 

Robert Lewis, A.B., Lawyer, 99 Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Chas. E. Lambert, A.M., Prof. Univ. of 
Oregon, Eugene City, Oregon. 

Henry K. Metcalf, Ph.B., Rev., Elvas- 
ton, 111. 

John T. Ray, Ph.B., Teacher, Highland 
Park, 111. 

Albert R. Robinson, A.M., Prin. Dore 
Pub. School, Chicago ; Hinsdale, 111. 

James F. Stout, A.M., Rev., B & 77, Dan- 
ville, 111. 

Chas. W. Turner, A.B., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Herman H. Unland, A.B., $ K 2, Busi- 
ness, Beardstown, 111. 



129 



WT WT W 



1875 (Continued.) 



Thomas Vanscoy, A.M., Rev., Pres. Will- 
amette Univ., Salem, Oregon. 

Francis M. Warrington, A.M., B & II, 
Theo. Student, Boston Univ., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Emily F. Wheeler, A.M., Boston, Mass. 



George H. White, Ph.B., Lawyer, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Amy C. Kellogg, Ph.B., Ft. Atkinson, 
Wis. 

Emily W. Minium, Atkinson, 111. 



1876. 



Nathan R. Allen, C.E., Business, Keno- 
sha, Wis. 

Alanson S. Appleton, A.B., 2 X, Jour- 
nalist, 133 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

William S. Arnold, A.M., Prof. Willa- 
mette Univ., Salem, Oregon. 

James E. Bell, A.B., Rev., Hollidays- 
burg, Pa. 

Smith S. Bradford, A.M., Rev., Traer, la. 

Walter Lee Brown, Sc.B., Chemist and 
Assayer, Metropolitan Blk., Chicago. 

Leonard G. Cochran, A.M., Rev., La 
Fayette, 111. 

* Drayton L. Connell, C.E., $K2 (1883.) 

John Currer, A.M., Rev. 

Chas. M. Ellinwood, Ph.B., Prof. Simp- 
son Coll., Indianola, Iowa. 

Theophilus B. Hilton, A.M., Rev., 2 X, 
Sterling, 111. 

Charles W. Hudson, A.B., Business, 
Waukegan, 111. 

Francis M. Jones, C.E., Pueblo, Col. 

John Krantz, A.M., Rev., Newark, N. J. 

Frank W. Lord, A.B., M.D., Piano, 111. 

La Fayette E. McGarry, Sc.B., Teacher, 
Calloa, Mo. 



Samuel S. McPherrin, A.M., Lawyer, 

Clarinda, Iowa. 
Andrew W. McPherson, A.B., B & 77, 

Teacher, Rockford, 111. 
Winfield S. Matthew, A.M., Rev., 2 X, 

St. Paul, Minn. 
Earl F. Potter, C.E., 4> K 2, Civ. Eng., 

Huron, D. T. 
Frank H. Scott, A.M., LL.B., B O 77, 

101 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Fred. M. Taylor, A.M., 2 X, Professor 

Albion Coll., Albion, Mich. 
* Samuel E. Van Petten, A.B. 
Charles P. Wheeler, A.M., 2 X, Sec. 

Eureka Coal Co., 95 Dearborn St., 

Chicago, 111. 
John J. Whipple, A.B., Rev., $ K 2, 

Arlington, 111. 

nee Brown, Sterling, 



Marengo, III. 
Ph.B., nee Parks, 



Jessie Hilton, A.B. 
111. 

Etta S. Linn, B.L.. 

Emma E. Weller, 
Pomona, Cal. 

Mary Pattison, Ph.B., Freeport, 111. 

Jane E. Kryder, Ph.B., nee Pattison, Ore- 
gon, 111. 



1877. 



Martin L. Andersen, A.M., 2 X, Stock 
Raising, Ravenswood, 111. 

Howard R. Antes, A.B., Rev., Newark, 111. 

Edwin J. Bickel, A.M., Rev., (Ed. Mon- 
tana Christian Advocate) Helena, 
Montana. 

Timothy C.Bradley,C.E., Kansas City, Mo. 

Frank M. Bristol, A.M., Rev., $ K 2, 
Pastor Grace Church, Chicago, 111. 

Albert H. Burr, Ph.B., M.D., 584 State 
St., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. W. Carr, Ph.B., Rev., B G 77, 
Toulon, 111. 

Frank F. Casseday, Ph.B., M.D., $ K2, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Alfred Cook, A.M., Journalist, Piano, 111. 

Frank H. Cutler, Sc.B., M.D., Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 

Robert E. Earll, Sc.,B.. Prof., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Albert D. Early, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Rockford, 111. 

E. B. L. Elder, A.M., Rev., Ellis, Kas. 

Frank M. Elliot, B.L.,21, Real Estate, 
Evanston, 111. 

Wm. G. Evans, A.B., 2 X, Real Estate, 
Denver, Col. 

* Clarence A. Gardner, Ph.B., $ K 2. 



Wm. J. Hathaway, A.B., Rev., Decatur, 

Mich. 
Arthur S. Kimball, A.B., B II, Com. 

Mer., 22 Pacific Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Frank E. Knappen, A.M., 2 X, Lawyer, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Charles L. Logan, A.M., Rev., Bishop 

Creek, Cal. 
Oliver P. McCool, A.M., B Q 77, Busi- 
ness, Freeport, 111. 
Charles H. Morgan, A.M., Rev., East 

Saginaw, Mich. 
Lorenzo T. Potter, B.L., M.D., <£ K 2, 

2139 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Cornelius E. Rice, A.B., Teacher, Stur- 

gis, Mich. 
Martin S. Robison, Jr., C.E., $ K 2, 

Street Car Railway, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Rob't B. Seaman, A.M., Rev., Maquon,Ill. 
Charles W. Thornton, A.M., Rev., BSU, 

Mendota, 111. 
Delos M. Tompkins, A.M., B S II, 

Missionary, Nynee Tal, India. 
Anna A. Elder, nee Davis, B.L., Ellis, Kas. 
Elizabeth R. Hunt, M.L., A F, Evans- 
ton, 111. 
Marion L. Matthew, nee Pomeroy, Ph.B., 

St. Paul, Minn. 



130 



1878. 



George E. Ackerman, A.M., Rev., B & 

77, Warsaw, N. Y. 
E. Wyllys Andrews, A.M., M.D., 2 X, 

65 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
Geo. M. Bassett, A.M., Rev., 1612 Mil- 
waukee Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Wm. M. Booth, A.M., 2 X, Lawyer, 152 

Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
Abner Clark, A.B., Rev., Waverly, 111. 
Wm. L. Demorest, A.B., Rev., 2 X, 

Downers Grove, 111. 
John R. Edwards, A.B., Cheshire, Ohio. 
Conrad A. Haney, A.B., Rev., # K 2, 

Normal, 111. 
Wm. H. Harris, A.M., 2 X, Lawyer, 

New York. 
Clarence H. Harvey, Ph.B. 
Junius C. Hoag, Ph.M., M.D., <£ K 2, 

Winnetka, 111. 
Frank S. Johnson, A.M., M.D., <£ K 2, 

4 Sixteenth St., Chicago, 111. 
Jacob Kagey, A.B., Rev., Buena Vista, 

Col. 



Louis Karcher, Ph.B., $ K W, Lawyer,, 
Freeport, 111. 

Edward M. Kinman, A.M., B (-) II, Post- 
master, Jacksonville, 111. 

*Cvrus F. Kryder, B.L., B S 77(1884.) 

Joseph T. Ladd, A.M., Rev., Galena, 111. 

Frank Macard, A.B., Rev. 

Rasmus Nielson, A.B. 

Charles S. Northrop, B.L., Lawyer, Nord 
Land, D. T. 

Charles H. Quereau, A.M., Business,. 
Aurora, 111. 

Charles L. Root, Sc.M., $ K W, Lyons, 
Iowa. 

James M. Wheaton, A.M., Rev., New 
Milford, 111. 

Mary E. Garst, B.L., Champaign, 111. 

Bertha G. Goodwin, B.L., Rockford, 111. 

Mary E. Ring, nee Parks, B.L., St. Law- 
rence, D. T. 

Ida Breed, nee Stuart, A.B., Pueblo, 
Col. 



1879. 



Edward C. Adams, A.M., M.D., $ K 2, 
Watertown, D. T. 

Isaac E. Adams, A.M., B (~) II, Lawyer, 
90 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Charles E.Cook, A.B., M.D., Mendota, 111. 

Dexter P. Donelson, A.B., 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Evanston, 111. 

Wm. A. Hamilton, A.M., B S II, Law- 
yer, Superior, Wis. 

Hugh Harrison, Ph.B., Business, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Henry B. Hemenway, A.M., M.D., Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 

Wm. T. Hobart, A.B., B & 77, Mission- 
ary, Pekin, China. 

Thomas H. Hood, Ph.B., B & 77, Law- 
yer, Opera House Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

George H. Horswell, A.M., B.D., <Z> K W, 
Instructor, N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 

Douglas V. Jackson, B.L., $ K 2, Law- 
yer, Muscatine, Iowa. 

Wm. B. Leach, A.M., Rev., 652 W. 21st 
St., Chicago, 111. 

S. Lewis, A.B., Miss'y, Chunking, China. 



Joseph Coombe, A.B., Rev., Catlin, 111 
Nathan S. Davis, Jr., A.M., M.D., 2 X 

65 Randolph St,, Chicago, 111. 
Frank B. Dyche, A.B., $ K 2, Lawyer 

123 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
Charles A. Foulks, Ph.M., M.D., 2X 

Vincennes, Ind. 
Almon W. Greenman, Ph.B., Missionary 

Queretaro, Mexico. 
Charles H. Hamilton, Sc.B., # K 2 

Miller, Ottawa, 111. 
Sidney M. Harris, A.B., A K E, Herman 

Minn. 
George W. Hewitt, A.B., Franklin Grove 

111. 



James T. Musgrove, A.M., Rev., B (-) 77, 

Argo, Col. 
Edward L. Stewart, Sc.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 

162 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Frank E. Tyler, Sc.B., $ K 2, Kansas 

City, Mo. 
Wm. H. Wait, A.M., B G 77, Prof. 111. 

Wes. Univ., Bloomington, 111. 
George W. White, Ph.B., Rev., Brandon, 

Wis. 
Ella V. Ambrose, B.L., Decorah, Iowa. 
Mary Bayne, B.L., Warren, 111. 
* Lilla M. Hemenway, nee Bradley, B.L. 
Lillie C. Musgrove, nee Casey, Ph.B., 

Argo, Col. 
Jessie McPherrin, nee Moore, A.B., 

Clarinda, Iowa. 
Sarah E. Patten, nee Prindle, Ph.M., 

Englewood, 111. 
Clara Shumway, B.L. , Polo, 111. 
Isabella B. Parks, nee Webb, A.M., 

Indianola, Iowa. 
Jane H. White, Ph.M., Teacher, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

1880. 

Robert B. Jessup, Ph.B., M.D., 2 X, 

Vincennes, Ind. 
Duston Kemble, A.B., # K W, Mission- 



ary, Leon, Mexico. 

John E. Lipps, Ph.B,, 2 X, Silk Manu- 
facturer, Riveria, France. 

George Merritt, A.M., Rev., Ada, Minn. 

Charles J. Michelet, A.B., Lawyer, 115 
Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

William B. Norton, A M., Rev., B & 77, 
Erie, 111. 

John H. Pryor, A.B., $ KW, Newell, la. 

Elias F. Shipman, A.M. ,M.D., Chicago, 111. 

Nels E. Simonsen, A.B., Rev., Pres. 
Norw. Theo. Sem., Evanston, 111. 



131 



1880 (Continued.) 



Levi P. Warrington, A.B., C. M. Col., 
Chicago, 111. 

Thomas C. Warrington, A.M., Rev., 
Peotone, 111. 

Francis A. Wood, A.M., Aurora, Neb. 

Bessie Helmer, nee Bradwell, A.M., 1428 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Nellie A.Barnes, «^Lewis,B.L.,Joliet,Ill. 

Dolly V. Purcell, nee Mesick, B.L., Plain- 
well, Mich. 



Helen L. Miller, Ph.B., Riverside, 111. 

Emma Lacy, nee Nind, Ph.B., Pleasant 
Prairie, Wis. 

Ellen M. Pryor, Ph.B., Moline, ill. 

Cassie M. dishing, nee Scott, Ph.B., New 
York, N. Y. 

Ettie L. Smith, A.B., Havana, 111. 

Julia D. Watson, Ph.B., Evanston, 111. 

Mary E. Rice, nee Webster, B.L., Evans- 
ton, 111. 



1881. 



Frank T. Andrews, A.M., M.D., 2 X, 
65 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Arthur H. Briggs, A.B., B 77, Theo. 
Stu. Boston Univ., Boston, Mass. 

John P. Brushingham, A.M., Rev., # K 
W, 65 Artesian Ave., Chicago, 111. 

John C. Butcher, A.M., M.D., A T, 
Missionary, India. 

William R. Chamberlain, Ph.B., A T, 
Lawyer, 80 Dearborn St., Chicago, 
111. 

Eben P. Clapp, A.M., M.D., Evanston, 111. 

Joseph M. Cormack, A.M., Rev., A 2", 
Wilton Center, 111. 

Moses S. Cross, A.M., B & 77, Student 
Leipsic Univ., Germany. 

Raymond N. De Groff, Sc.B., 2 X, 
Journalist, Sterling, 111. 

George A. Foster, A.B., 73 77, Busi- 
ness, 147 5th Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Walter B. Helm, Sc.B., M.D., Rockford, 
111. 

William H. Huston, A.B., Farmer, Britt, 
Iowa. 

Geo. N. Herrick, Ph.B., Rev., Knights- 
town, Ind. 

Benjamin B. James, A.M., Teacher, 
Evanston, 111. 

William H. Lacy, A.M., Rev., $ K W, 
Pleasant Prairie, Wis. 



Joseph A. Matlack, A.M., Rev., <£ K W, 

386 So. Paulina St., Chicago, 111. 
Nathan C. Miller, Ph.B., A T, Teacher, 

McGregor, Iowa. 
James E. Nichol, A.B., Rev., Russell, 

Iowa. 
Frederick Porter, A.M., Rev., A V, 

Batavia, 111. 
Frank L. Rice, Sc.B., <2» K 2, Boiler 

Manufacturer, Evanston, 111. 
John Schneider, A.M., Rev., Edgerton, 

Wis. 
Claudius B. Spencer, A.M., Rev., $ K 

2, Detroit, Mich. 
Polemus H. Swift, A.M., Rev., A V, 

Rockford, 111. 
Frank H. Thatcher, Ph.M., B (-) 77, Law- 
yer, Aurora, 111. 
Parker S. Webster, A.M., AT, Lawyer, 

Dubuque, Iowa. 
Frederick S. Wheeler, A.M., Business, 

New York. 
Elizabeth C. McArthur, A.M., Rockford, 

111. 
Jane H. Cormack, nee Marshall, B.L., 

A $, Wilton Center, 111. 
Emma P. James, nee Meserve, Ph.B., 

/ <Z>, Evanston, 111. 
Martha G. Pooley, nee Skelton, Ph.M., 

Joliet, 111. 



1882. 



Stanley P. Black, Ph.B., M.D., $ K 2, 
Cook County Hosp., Chicago, 111. 

Alva G. Briggs, A.B., B & 77, Business, 
Sierra City, Cal. 

* William F. Carroll, A.B., B (-) 77(1885.) 

James S. Conwell, Sc.B., $ K 2, Busi- 
ness, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Chas. W. Darrow, Sc.B., Lawyer, C. B. 
& Q. R. R. Gen. Offices, Chicago, 111. 

William A. Dyche, A.B., 3> K 2, Drug- 
gist, 65 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Walter A. Evans, A.B., Rev., A T, Janes- 
ville, Wis. 

Nathan J. Harkness, Ph.B., Rev., A T, 
589 W. Erie St., Chicago, 111. 

John Lee, A.M., Rev., Wyanet, 111. 

Robert E. McPherrin, A.B., A V, Busi- 
ness, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Frank W. Merrell, A.B., Rev., <£ K W, 
Princeville, 111. 

Peter D. Middlekauff, Ph.B., A T, Busi- 
ness, Evanston, 111. 



Harry H. Miller, Sc.B., B & 77, Mining 
Eng., Port Arthur, Ont. 

Wm. Otjen, A.B., Rev., Milledgeville. 111. 

Charles E. Piper, A.B., <2> K W, 3443 
Paulina St., Chicago, 111. 

Robert H. Pooley, A.B., Rev., A 1", 
Joliet, 111. 

Fred H. Sheets, A.B., Rev., 73 O 77, 
Oregon, 111. 

Jessie S. Brown, w^Cowles, Ph.B., Fre- 
mont, Neb. 

Emily M. Hobart, nee Hatfield, A.B., 
Pekin, China. 

Lydia L. Jones, A.B., K K F, Teacher, 
Fremont Normal, Fremont, Neb. 

Emma M. Prindle, Ph.B., Evanston, 111. 

Adele Hall, nee Somers, Chicago, 111. 

Ella M. Tarr, B.L, A F, Lewiston, Idaho. 

Sarah E. White, Ph.B., A F, So. Evans- 
ton, 111. 



1883. 



John C. Bannister, A.B., B S 77, Teacher, 

Princeton, 111. 
Henry O. Cady, A.B., Rev., A T, Student 

G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 
Asahel H. Denman, Ph.B., Lawyer, Iowa 

City, Iowa 
Martin M. Gridley, Ph.B., <£ K 2, Law- 
yer, 89 Madison St., Chicago, 111. 
James T. Hatfield, A.B., B S 77, Evans - 

ton, 111. 
Alfred E. Hills, A.B., A V, Post Grad. 

Stud. N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 
Frank E. Lord, A.B., B II, Lawyer, 

101 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Wm. A. Phillips, Ph.B., <Z> K2, Student 

Harv. Med. Coll. ; Evanston, 111. 
Louis S. Rice, Ph.B., $ K 2, Business, 

Denver, Col. 
Charles H. Sharer, Ph.B., B & 77, Asst. 

Post Master, Mt. Morris, 111. 



Amos R. Solenberger, Ph.B., M.D., £ 7i 

W, Itasca, 111. 
Merritt E. Taylor, Sc.M., Instructor N. 

W. U., Evanston, 111. 
Nelson P. Webster, Ph.B., Business, 

Topeka, Kas. 
Wm. E. Wilkinson, A.B., <£ KW, Stu- 
dent G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 
Anna L. Crandon, Ph.B., AT, Evanston, 

111. 
Emily Greenman, Ph. B., Marion, Ind. 
Harriet A. Kimball, Ph.B., Instructor, 

N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 
Minnie R. Moulding, B.L., A $,' Lake 

View, 111. 
Mary E. Norton, Ph.B., Winona, Minn. 
Isabella Ross, Ph.B., Teacher, Rogers 

Park, 111. 



1884. 



Wilbur F. Atchison, A.B., Rev., A T, 

Des Plaines, 111. 
Leon E. Bell, A.B., Rev., A T, Orange- 

ville, 111. 
Wm. H. Crawford, A.B., Rev., £ K W, 

Ravenswood, 111. 
Albert D. Currier, Sc.B., 2 X, Student 

Mass. Ins. Tech. ; Neponset, 111. 
Chas. Horswell, A.B., $ KW, Instructor, 

G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 
George P. Merrick, B.L., 2 X, Law 

Student, 106 Dearborn St., Chicago, 

111. 
Edmund B. Patterson, A.B., Rev., New 

Buffalo, Mich. 
Chas. G. Plummer, B.L., A T, Med. 

Student, 70 Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
Charles S. Raddin, Sc.B., $K2, Busi- 
ness, Evanston, 111. 



Wm. D. Sargent, A.B., £ K2, Student, 

Evanston, 111. 
Zella F. Adams, B.L., Prof. Atlanta 

Univ., Atlanta, Ga. 
Mary A. Bennett, A.B., A r, Rossville, 

111. 
Florence M. Cowles, nee Call, B.L., 

Algona, Iowa. 
Leila M. Crandon, B.L., A T, Prof. Lewis 

Coll., Glasgow, Mo. 
Mary A. Sheets, nee Hill, B.L., A T, 

Oregon, 111. 
Adella G. Maltbie, B.L., A 4>, Prof. U. 

I. U., Fayette, Iowa. 
Helen M. Redfield, Ph.B., A T, Teacher, 

Beloit, Wis. 
Fannie Simpson, B.L., K KT, Teacher, 

Troy, N. Y. 



1885. 



Owen Wheaton Battey, A.B., A V, Tis- 

kilwa, 111. 
David H. Bloom, A.B., B & II, Student, 

U. C. of Law ; Tiskilwa, 111. 
Samuel L. Boddy, Ph.B., B G 77, Law 

Student, Cherokee, Iowa. 
William C. Chase, A.B., Business, Quincy, 

111. 
Frank Cook, A.B., A T, Crete, 111. 
Wm. D. Fullerton, A.B., B S 77, Teacher, 

Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Edward D. Huxford, Sc.B., B (-) 77, 

Cherokee, Iowa. 
William R. Light, A.B., Teacher, Mont- 

pelier, Vt. 
Rush McNair, A.B., 4> KW, Student C. 

M. Col., Black Berry Station, 111. 
Eugene E. McDermott, Sc.B., A T, Law 

Student, Lancaster, Wis. 
Gerhardt C. Mars. A.B., * K W , Stu- 
dent G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 



Leonard L. Skelton, A.B., A 7", Teacher, 

Vineyard, Ark. 
Charles S. Slichter, Sc.B., 2 X, Teacher, 

166 Egan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Sidney Watson, Sc.B., 2 X, Clerk, C. & 

N. W. R. R., Evanston, 111. 
Charles A. Wightman, Ph.B., 2 X, Asst. 

Ticket Receiver, Pa. R. R. Co., 

Evanston, 111. 
Mary Henry, A.B., A $, Teacher, Ne- 
braska Central Col., Central City, 

Neb. 
Mary E. Moore, B.L., A <i>, Winona, 111. 
Ellen M. Sawyer, Ph.B., A $, Streator, 

111. 
Kate L. Sharp, Ph.B., KKF, Maywood, 

111. 
Mary B. Swail, Ph.B., A $, Teacher, 

Belvidere, 111. 
Nellie F. Weeks, Ph.B., Student Vassar 

Coll., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



* Deceased. t Graduate of Northwestern Female College. 



133 



v~v~w + v<m v ~ v mv^r^ 



^^J 




H. L. K— nd— g : 

" To follow foolish precedents and wink with both our eyes, is easier 
than to think." 

W. E. G—FF— RD : 

" Fat, fair and forty." 

O. I. L sh : 

"He is a little chimney, and heated hot in a moment." 

C. E. L — B — rg — R : 

"I protest against this whole proceeding most emphatically." 

C. H. B— th : 

" Then I fixt my wistful eyes on two fair images." 

A. R. Ed rds : 

" A mighty wonder bred among our cpuiet crew." 

R W. SP G— R : 

" Noisy was he, and gamesome as a boy." 

E. C. P— ge : 

" Heavy his low-hung lip did oft appear 
Deprest by weight of musing phantasy, 
Profound his forehead was, though not severe, 
Yet some did think he had little business here." 

F. H. Bl tt : 

"To sleep I give my powers away." 

H. C — dd — ck : 

"Comrades, leave me here a little, while as yet 'tis early morn." 

F. L le : 

"Hath any man seen him at the barber's ?" 

D. H. CxL ss : 

" A voice, if it can be called so, like the efforts of a broken old pair of 
bellows." 

E. C. Q R u : 

"A mighty man at cutting and drying he was." 

W. A. H— ll : 

"Iron-sinewed, horny-handed, 
Shoulders broad, and chest expanded." 

134 



H. B wn : 

" A big, loud man with a stare and a metallic laugh." 

F. C. D— m st : 

" Yet, even in his fancy reigned supreme, 
The ideal woman of a young man's dream." 

H. 0. C— DY : 

"And leaning back, he yawned and fell asleep." 

M. E. D— v— d : 

" A maiden modest and yet self-possessed." 

C. Br — df — rd : 

" A shock headed, awkward, shambling lad." 

E. A. Sch — LL : 

" Still dauntless, 'mid the wreck of earth, he'd smile.' 

B. L. McF— dd— n : 

" Little epitome of man." 

B. M. W d— n : 

" Blest with an infant's ignorance of all 
But his own simple pleasures." 

G. W. K stm — nn : 

" Brimful with learning, see that pedant stride, 
Bristling with horrid Greek and stuffed with pride.' 

F. W. B rs : 

" One, whom the music of his own vain tongue 
Doth ravish, like enchanting harmony." 

F. T— w— E : 

" There be none of beauty's daughters 
With a magic like thee." 

E. B. Gr ne : 

"In years, I ween, he was rather green." 

G. W. L— w— s : 

" Thou art said to have a stubborn soul." 

H. M. My — rs: 

*#•*#<< jj er voice was ever soft, 

Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman." 

W. J. And ws : 

" Look to your babe, my Lord, 'tis yours," 

C. J. T— sd— l : 

" What cracker is this same, that deafs our ears 
With this abundance of superfluous breath ? " 

E. W. A — ST— N : 

" O, little feet, that such long years, 
Must wander 'round through hopes and fears." 

135 



W. E. McL— nn— n : 

***** " On his upper lip 
His beard a good palm's length, at least, 
Level and pointed at the tips, 
Shot sideways like a swallow's wings." 

The Bib : 

"I am a man whom fortune hath cruelly scratched." 

C. C. B— M— nn : 

" Ah, pensive scholar, what is fame ? " 

Dr. B — NBR — GHT : 

"Please draw the green cord." 

O. M. H — w — rd : 

" As idle as a painted ship 
Upon a painted ocean." 

Freshman Girls : 

"Uncertain, coy and hard to please." 

M. J— n— s : 

" Varium et mutabile semper femina." 

L. O. P— rl— y : 

"He's quite altered — they've made him a dandy, quite a new sort of 
creature, unknown yet to scholars." 

C. S. T— ML— NS— N : 

"He was the mildest-mannered man 
That ever scuttled ship, or cut a throat." 

O. M — DDL — K — FF : 

"But strive still to be a man before your mother." 

Adelphic : 

" We adjourn this count till further day." 

C. L. All — n : 

"There's little of the melancholy element in her." 

H. D. Atch — s — n : 

"I am loved of all the ladies." 

E. L. Sh — m — n : 

"All the wealth I have 
Runs in my veins ; I am a gentleman." 

Senior Boys : 

Very unclubable men. 

F. By— rs : 

" Thou little girlish boy ; 
Fit play-fellow for fairies, by moonlight pale.'' 

H. F. Br— ggs : 

" A horse ! a horse ! my kingdom for a horse ! " 

136 



Prof. Gr n — r : 

"Lay on, MacDuff ; 
And damned be he that first cries 
Hold, enough." 

H. M. H— ld— n : 

" I was not born under a rhyming planet." 

S. S. F— RL— Y : 

" Methinks, sometimes, I have no more wit than an ordinary man has." 

J. E. H— NT : 

" Heaven bless thee ! 
Thou hast the sweetest face I ever looked on." 

F. M — DDL — K — ff : 
"Now Jove, in his next commodity of hair, send thee a beard." 

S. P. Edm — nds — n : 

"For I am nothing, if not critical." 

T. R. Gr ne : 

"And when you stick on conversation burrs, 
Don't strew your pathway with those dreadful rrrs." 

H. R. C — lk — ns : 

"When he shall die, 
Take him and cut him up in little stars." 

Junior Girls : 

"Wretched un ideaed girls." 

J. B. Y ng : 

" And each particular hair did stand on end, 
" Like quills upon the fretful porcupine." 

G. 0. R— ch n : 

" Be wise with speed, 
A fool at forty is a fool indeed." 

F. C. Wh d : 

" A proper stripling, and an amorous." 

Prof. P — rs — n : 

"A man that hath a mint of phrases in his brain." 

E. L. C— l— n : 

"I have married a wife, and, therefore, I cannot come." 

W. H. T— tt— e : 

" Well, I am not fair, and, therefore, I pray the gods make me honest." 

P. R. Sh— m— y : 

"The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's 
hand is not able to taste, his tongue conceive, nor his heart to 
report what methinks I am." 

B. St e : 

" Why, here he comes swelling like a turkey-cock." 

137 



A^A^A^A^Ai 



R. O. V— ND- 



" Still conscious of his wondrous excellence." 

C. L. St — v — ns : 

"A gentleman that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak more in a 
minute than he will stand to in a month." 

S. H. M — DDL — K— FF : 

"He sits among us like a descended god." 

G. A. B— ss : 

"When I come to woo ladies, I fright them." 

S. C. D— v— s : 

"If he be not in love with some woman, there is no believing in old 
signs; a' brushes his hat o' mornings ; what should that abode ?" 

A. O. P RS— N : 

"Thou wilt be as valiant as the wrathful dove, or most magnanimous 
mouse." 

I. H — rv — Y : 

" Ask me if I can refrain from love." 

R H. H— ld— n : 

"Though the chameleon love can feed on air, I am one that am nour- 
ished by my victuals." 

P. B. B— ss : 

" I am as true as truth's simplicity, 
And simpler than the infancy of truth." 

W. D RBY E : 

" God made him, and, therefore, let him pass for a man." 

K. M. A ng : 

" An angel is like you, Kate, and you are like an angel." 

C. M. D ny : 

" Small show of man was yet upon his chin." 

Senior Girls : 

"Maidens withering on the stalk." 

1. C. C — RT GHT : 

" For methinks I am marvelous hairy about the face, and I am such a 
tender ass, if my hair do but tickle, I must scratch." 

H. M. P rs — ns : 

" Sir, as I have a soul, she's an angel." 

C. B l : 

" There swims no goose so grey, but soon or late, 
She finds some honest gander for a mate." 

Dr. C — M NGS : 

" Explaining metaphysics to the nation, 
I wish he would explain his explanation." 

138 



H. H— W— LL : 

"You beat your pate and fancy wit will come, 
Knock as you please, there's nobody at home." 

L. F. K ly : 

" Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps." 

Prof. K — ll — gg : 

" He was in logic a great critic, 
Profoundly skilled in analytic, 
He could distinguish and divide 
A hair 'twixt south and southwest side." 

C. C— se : 

" She is pretty to walk with, 
And witty to talk with, 
And pleasant, too, to think on." 

L. Ch — p — N : 

" The baby figure of the giant mass of things to come." 

A. M. Sw — ft : 

" She move a goddess, and she looks a queen." 

G. H — bb — rd : 

" A fine press gentleman, that's all perfume." 

C. H. Br— nd : 

"That one can smile, and smile, and be a villain still." 

J. H. H— ll : 

"None but himself can be his parallel." 

A. T. F— sk : 

" There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple." 

C. A. Pl— ce : 

" It is not good that man should be alone." 

Tau Beta Gamma : 

" Thirteen Big Geese." 

A. T — wns — nd : 

" Had I been two, another and myself, 
Our head would have o'erlooked the world." 

C. W. F— rg n : 

" Speak to him, ladies, see if you can move him." 

A. T— w— e : 

"Then (s)he will talk ; ye gods ! how (s)he will talk." 

R. I. Fl — m — ng : 

"What he says you can believe, and pawn your soul upon it." 

G. W. D— x— n : 

"The polliwog died a' laughing 
To see him wag his jaw." 

139 



A«fcA^A^A^A^A^A«fcA^A^ k 



G. Gr — NM — N : 

"Fit for the mountains, and the barbarous eaves, 
Where manners ne'er were preached." 

Chapel, with Sophs on Back of Seat : 

" There was a general whisper, too, and wiggle, 
But etiquettee forbade them all to giggle." 

Prof. C — mn — ck : 

" Now with a giant's might 
He heaves the ponderous thought ; 
Now pours the storm of eloquence, 
With scathing lightning fraught." 

The Faculty : 

"To mourn a mischief that is past and gone 
Is the next way to draw new mischief on." 

C. C. Cl — FF — RD : 

" Hence, horrible shadow, unreal mockery, hence !" 

I. R. H— tt : 

"Plenty of room at the top." 

Prof. B rd : 

" Cut it down." 

L. Ambr — se : 

" Man delights me not." 

A. C. W— L— s : 

"She has spirit to act whatever her heart approves.' 

Sophomore Girls : 

" Woman's at best a contradiction still." 







^^^< 



140 

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I^ortbvuestepn University, 

Joseph $ummmg$, j>* j> v SSi>-, Pr**Htod. 

$ixiy professors and Instructors, and oucr ^00 giudcnts. 

The University includes the following Departments : 

i. The College of Liberal Arts, with four regular courses of study and 
opportunity for a select course. 

2. The Woman's College gives a young woman the highest advantages of a 
well regulated home. They are admitted to the same courses of study and receive the 
same degrees as young men. Those who choose, may pursue preparatory and aca- 
demic studies, and Music, Drawing and Painting. The College Cottage is a conven- 
ient, well furnished home near the College, and by the special arrangements there 
made, excellent accommodations are furnished to young ladies at a very moderate cost. 

3. The School or Oratory. 

4. The School of Art. 

5. The Preparatory Department. This gives opportunity for preparation 
for any college, and furnishes, under highest advantages, a wide range of academic 
studies preparatory to professional or practical pursuits. For academic students there 
is a course requiring three years' study, on the completion of which a Diploma will be 
given. 

6. The Conservatory of Music, in which all departments of Music are taught. 

7. College Theology. 
College of Medicine. 



College of Law. 



The University is located in Evanston, which is the most beautiful suburb ot Chi- 
cago, and is one of the best and most healthy summer resorts on the Great Lakes, 
having all the advantages of City and all the enjoyments of Rural Life. It is unusually 
free from immoral influences. The sale of intoxicating drinks is prohibited by its 
charter within four miles of the University. 

For Catalogues address the President, or Prof. H. F. Fisk, the Principal of the 
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UNION COLLEGE OF LAW, 

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HENRY P. RIDGAWAY, D. D., Pres. and Cornelia Miller Prof, of Practical Theology. 

MINER RAYMOND, D. D.. LL.D., Professor of Systematic Theology. 

CHARLES K. BRADLEY, B. D., Prof, of New Testament Exegesis. 

MILTON S. TERRY, D. D., Professor of Old Testament Exegesis. 

CHARLES W. BENNETT, D. D., Professor of Historical Theology. 

ROBERT L. CUMMOCK, A. M., Professor of Elocution. 

CHARLES W. HORSWELL, A. M., Instructor in Elementary Greek. 

WM. ROLLINS, Instructor in Elementary Hebrew. 

The HON. GRANT GOODRICH, President. I fi , . Trustee „ 

Mr. ORINGTON LUNT, Secretary. £ Board ot lrustees. 



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